RELIGION

The Latest: The Latest: victory

  • A woman walks by banners of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during an election watch event hosted by the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016.  The United States headed for the polls to vote for their new president on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    A woman walks by banners of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during an election watch event hosted by the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. The United States headed for the polls to vote for their new president on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)  (The Associated Press)

  • Debra D'Angelo, second from left, of Pinehurst, N.C., a supporter of President-elect Donald Trump, argues with a group of Hillary Clinton supporters in front of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

    Debra D'Angelo, second from left, of Pinehurst, N.C., a supporter of President-elect Donald Trump, argues with a group of Hillary Clinton supporters in front of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)  (The Associated Press)

  • President-elect Donald Trump speaks during an election night rally, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

    President-elect Donald Trump speaks during an election night rally, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)  (The Associated Press)

The Latest on the 2016 presidential elections. (All times EST):

3:45 a.m.

Russian President Vladimir Putin is giving a thumbs-up to president-elect Donald Trump's victory.

In a brief statement Wednesday, the Kremlin said Putin has sent Trump a telegram to congratulate him on winning. Putin expressed "his hope to work together for removing Russian-American relations from their crisis state."

Putin also says he has confidence that building a constructive dialogue between Moscow and Washington — one based on principles of equality, mutual respect and a real accounting of each other's positions — is in the interest of both nations and the world.

Trump has drawn criticism for repeatedly praising Putin's leadership and advocating a closer working relationship with Russia despite its record of human rights abuses and recent military incursions in Ukraine and Syria.

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4:10 a.m.

Muslim Advocates, a national legal advocacy and educational organization based in Oakland, California, is denouncing Donald Trump's victory, saying his views violate the foundation of America's democracy.

In a statement issued after Trump appeared at a New York hotel to celebrate his victory, the group said it has repeatedly expressed concern about what it said were "undemocratic and unconstitutional policies" proposed by candidates, such as banning Muslims from the U.S. and vilifying Mexican Americans.

The group vowed to use every legal tool available to protect the country against unconstitutional and undemocratic action.

The Republican president-elect has accused Mexico of sending rapists and other criminals across the border. And he called at one point for a "total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States."

The group says in a statement: "If President-elect Trump wants to bring America together and be a leader for all Americans, he will need to disavow these dangerous proposals and ideas."

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4:47 a.m.

Despite Donald Trump's sharp criticism of NATO during the campaign, NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg says he's looking forward to working with the president-elect.

Trump has questioned whether NATO, an alliance of Western nations formed to counter the former Soviet Union, is outdated.

"We face a challenging new security environment, including hybrid warfare, cyberattacks, the threat of terrorism," Stoltenberg said in a statement. "U.S. leadership is as important as ever. ... A strong NATO is good for the United States, and good for Europe."

In July, Trump said the United States might abandon its NATO military commitments, including the obligation to defend members against attacks. After that, Vice President Joe Biden said he had met with the presidents of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia to reassure them that Trump doesn't represent America.

Biden said the three presidents were "scared to death" about the prospects of a Trump presidency and whether he would maintain the country's commitments to its NATO allies if they faced aggression from Russia.