The Latest on the 2016 presidential campaign (All times EDT):

2:05 p.m.

Donald Trump is warning that a Hillary Clinton victory in November would "endanger religious liberty" across America.

The Republican presidential nominee said that if Clinton won "religious liberty wouldn't be there" and the result would be "a different country."

Trump again vowed to overturn the Johnson Amendment, which prohibits houses of worship advancing specific candidates or political parties.

He made the remarks at a visit to the International Christian Academy, a charter school affiliated with the International Church of Las Vegas

He also visited an indoor soccer practice and a 1st grade classroom, where the students greeted him with the gift of a Bible and then recited both the Pledge of Allegiance and an adaption of that called Pledge to the Bible.

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12:50 p.m.

Hillary Clinton is at her Washington home, preparing for the second presidential debate.

Campaign chairman John Podesta, top aide Jake Sullivan and debate team advisers Ron Klain and Karen Dunn arrived at the Democratic nominee's home around lunchtime Wednesday.

Podesta told reporters that the town hall setting for Sunday's debate in St. Louis "is a natural format for her."

Podesta said "that's a format that Donald Trump isn't as used to."

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12:45 p.m.

Latino scholars and activists say Mike Pence's "whipping out that Mexican thing" remark during the vice presidential debate was dehumanizing and tinged with sexual innuendos.

The comment by Pence on Tuesday was an attempt to brush off rival Tim Kaine after he repeatedly raised Trump's critical comments about Hispanic immigrants. Pence said: : "Senator, you've whipped out that Mexican thing again."

By Wednesday Latino comedians, activist, and elected officials widely ridiculed Pence's reference on social media.

Syndicated cartoonist Lalo Alcaraz shared a picture of Trump's "Make America Great Again" red cap replaced with the words "whipping out that Mexican thing."

New Mexico Rep. Javier Martinez also tweeted "proud to be 'that Mexican thing'."

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11:45 a.m.

Bill Clinton is continuing the hard-sell to working class Ohio voters considering whether to send his wife to the White House.

The former president told a union hall audience Wednesday in Youngstown that Democrat Hillary Clinton wants an economy that allows Americans to "rise together." He said Republican Donald Trump is a dangerous alternative bent on more "trickle down" tax breaks for the wealthy and continued political gridlock.

Bill Clinton advised that "if you don't want somebody to drive a truck off a cliff, don't give 'em the keys."

The former president has been campaigning often in working-class areas where Trump's anti-globalization message has resonated.

Ohio has about 670,000 workers represented by unions. President Barack Obama won the state in 2012 by about 165,000 votes.

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11:20 a.m.

A Democratic congressman doesn't want union voters in his home state of Ohio to buy what Donald Trump is selling.

Tim Ryan says the Republican presidential nominee is offering "snake oil" with his promises to bolster the manufacturing economy. He blasted Trump for using steel and other materials from China in his own building projects.

Ryan said Trump fits a phrase "my little Italian grandmother used — 'due facce.' He has two faces."

Ryan was introducing Bill Clinton at a rally in Youngstown. He warned union workers that Trump would "gut you and he will walk over your cold dead body, and he won't even flinch."

About 670,000 Ohio residents in the battleground state are represented by unions. President Barack Obama won the state by about 165,000 votes in 2012.

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10:45 a.m.

Hillary Clinton is giving Tim Kaine's debate performance two thumbs up.

Spokesman Nick Merrill said Clinton emailed her running mate after Tuesday's debate to congratulate him.

The Democratic presidential nominee offered two thumbs up when she was asked a shouted question about Kaine's performance. She was at an airport in White Plains, New York, on Wednesday for a flight to Washington.

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8 a.m.

Donald Trump's campaign manager say Tim Kaine acted "like he had a tic" by mentioning Donald Trump so frequently in the debate.

Kellyann Conway said Trump is preparing "constantly" for his second debate against Hillary Clinton. She told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" that Trump should be "tough but fair" against Clinton in Sunday's debate.

But Conway is acknowledging that Trump needs to avoid getting distracted by fights about peripheral issues. She says Trump has a right to defend himself against attacks, but that he understands he's best when he's talking about Clinton or her record.

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7:35 a.m.

Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta says Mike Pence "didn't get the job done" in the vice presidential debate because he didn't defend running mate Donald Trump.

Podesta said Wednesday that Trump "lost" even though he wasn't in the debate. He said he doesn't think the debate changed the course of the race.

Podesta told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" that Clinton running mate Tim Kaine's job was to challenge Pence to defend Trump. He said Pence didn't do it.

Podesta said Pence came off as a reasonable and likeable guy, but seemed like he was more focused on his own presidential prospects in 2020 than on Trump's in 2016.

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6:30 a.m.

Some Mexican-Americans are taking issue with Republican Mike Pence brushing off GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump's comments on Mexican immigrants as "that Mexican thing."

Pence chided Democrat Tim Kaine's repeated mention of Trump's comments on immigrants during Tuesday night's vice presidential debate, telling him at one point: "Senator, you've whipped out that Mexican thing again."

The Indiana governor's remark has quickly become one of the most talked about moments from the primetime forum, trending online under #ThatMexicanThing. Twitter ranks it as the third most tweeted about moment of the debate.

Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's campaign has apparently taken note of the online attention. Visitors to ThatMexicanThing.com are being redirected to Clinton's campaign website.

3:30 a.m.

Republican Mike Pence was calm and steady in the face of Democrat Tim Kaine's fiery and frequent challenges. But when it came to defending Donald Trump, Pence dodged, sidestepped or was silent about some of his running mate's most provocative words.

Kaine aggressively pressured Pence Tuesday night to vouch for Trump throughout the 90-minute debate, often citing the brash businessman's own words. Pence defended Trump's tax history, but maneuvered around criticism of Trump's demeaning comments about women, his public doubting of President Barack Obama's citizenship and broader questions about temperament.

"I can't imagine how Governor Pence can defend the insult-driven, me-first style of Donald Trump," said Kaine, the Virginia senator and Hillary Clinton's No. 2.

The usually easygoing Kaine went on the attack from the start and seemed determined to make the debate a referendum on whether Trump has the disposition for the Oval Office.