The Latest on the fatal police shooting of a 40-year-old black man in Tulsa, Oklahoma (all times local):

5:45 p.m.

Dozens of protesters are calling for the immediate arrest of the Tulsa officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man whose vehicle was stalled in the middle of the street.

We the People Oklahoma organizer Marq Lewis called for the "immediate" arrest of Officer Betty Shelby, who fatally shot Terence Crutcher on Friday. Shelby has been on paid administrative leave since the shooting.

About three-dozen protesters gathered Monday afternoon outside the county courthouse to call for police reforms. The number of attendees was at least two-dozen more than those who attended a protest earlier in the day — hours before police released video that showed Crutcher's killing.

Supporters held signs reading, "Justice 4 Crutch" and "Relationships Matter." One young boy held up a sign that read "Don't Shoot."

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4:30 p.m.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Oklahoma is calling for criminal charges in a Tulsa police officer's fatal shooting of an unarmed black man, saying he was left to bleed to death while officers stood by without rendering aid.

ACLU of Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel says Terence Crutcher's death on Friday shows "how little regard" Tulsa police officers have for minority communities.

Crutcher was shot to death by a Tulsa officer who was responding to a report of a stalled vehicle. Dashcam and aerial footage released Monday by police showed Crutcher lying on the street, bleeding, and no one immediately administered medical aid.

A Tulsa police spokeswoman, Jeanne MacKenzie, said she couldn't comment Monday on whether officers have a set protocol on when to provide medical assistance.

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3:15 p.m.

A video from a Tulsa, Oklahoma, police vehicle shows Terence Crutcher walking toward his SUV with his hands up and a female officer following behind him.

The vehicle is stopped in the middle of the road. As Crutcher approaches the SUV, three male officers walk up and Crutcher appears to lower his hands and reach down and place them on the vehicle. The officers surround him, making it harder to see his actions from the police dashboard camera's angle.

Crutcher can be seen dropping to the ground. Someone on the police radio says, "I think he may have just been Tasered." One of the officers near Crutcher backs up slightly.

Then almost immediately, someone can be heard saying, "Shots fired." Crutcher's head then drops, leaving him lying completely out in the street.

After that a voice can be heard on the police radio saying, "Shots fired. We have one suspect down."

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2:15 p.m.

A federal prosecutor says the U.S. Department of Justice has opened a civil rights investigation into the fatal police shooting of an unarmed black man by a white Tulsa, Oklahoma, officer.

U.S. Attorney Danny C. Williams said Monday that the Justice Department investigation will be separate from a local one into whether criminal charges should be filed over Friday's shooting of 40-year-old Terence Crutcher.

Tulsa Police Chief Chuck Jordan said Monday that Crutcher had no weapon when he was shot to death by an officer who was responding to a report of a stalled vehicle.

Police plan to release audio and video recordings of the shooting later Monday.

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1:45 p.m.

The police chief in Tulsa, Oklahoma, says a black man who was shot to death by a white city police officer was not armed, and no weapon was found in his vehicle.

Police Chief Chuck Jordan said Monday that officers found no weapon on 40-year-old Terence Crutcher, who was shot to death by an officer who was responding to a report of a stalled vehicle.

Jordan did not release many details about Friday's shooting but made his comments as police prepared to release dashcam footage of the incident.

Crutcher's family is calling for a federal investigation and criminal charges against the officer.

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1:30 p.m.

The twin sister of a man shot to death by police in Tulsa, Oklahoma, is calling for criminal charges to be filed against the officer who fired the fatal shot.

Tiffany Crutcher and others have said police videos capture authorities referring to Terence Crutcher as a "big bad dude" before he was shot Friday night while officers responded to reports of a stalled vehicle. Tulsa police plan to release those videos to the public Monday afternoon.

Tiffany Crutcher said Monday that her is family is devastated over Terence Crutcher's death. She says the public needs to know that "big bad dude" was a loving father and son who sang in church each week.

She says the family is asking for "peaceful protests" over Terence Crutcher's death.

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1 p.m.

A lawyer for the family of a black man killed by a white Tulsa, Oklahoma, police officer says video of the shooting is so disturbing that it kept him awake at night.

Attorney Damario Solomon-Simmons says the video shows that 40-year-old Terence Crutcher didn't make any sudden movements before he was shot Friday by a Tulsa officer who was responding to a report of a stalled vehicle.

Solomon-Simmons says the video also calls into question police statements that Crutcher died at a hospital following the shooting. He says Crutcher "died on that street by himself in his own blood without any help."

The Tulsa Police Department plans to release videos of the encounter Monday afternoon.

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10:50 a.m.

About a dozen protesters have gathered outside the Tulsa County courthouse to protest the fatal police shooting of a black man whose SUV had stalled on a city street.

The protest Monday comes in response to the death of 40-year-old Terence Crutcher, who was shot Friday while reaching into his SUV. Authorities plan to release audio and video recordings of the shooting Monday afternoon.

Investigators say Crutcher approached officers as they investigated a stalled vehicle. Police spokeswoman Jeanne MacKenzie has said Crutcher refused orders to put up his hands, but a pastor who saw video footage says Crutcher had his hands up.

Protesters at the local courthouse waved signs reading, "This Stops Now" and "Not Going, Keep Protesting." They also chanted, "Hands up, don't shoot." One of them, Tulsa resident Mark Whited, says more needs to be done to "bridge the mistrusts" between communities.

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9:20 a.m.

A pastor who saw video of the fatal police shooting of a black man in Tulsa says the footage shows that the man's "hands were in the air."

Pastor Rodney Goss told the Tulsa World (http://bit.ly/2cINS4j ) that he was among the local community leaders who were shown footage of the shooting of 40-year-old Terence Crutcher ahead of its scheduled release to the public Monday afternoon.

Goss says he expects the public will be outraged. He says residents should respond with reason, not violence.

Tulsa Police Sgt. Shane Tuell says relatives were shown the recordings Sunday ahead of the planned public release.

Tulsa police say Crutcher was shot after his SUV stalled on a city street. Police spokeswoman Jeanne MacKenzie has said Crutcher refused orders to put up his hands. Authorities haven't said whether he had a weapon.

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7:45 a.m.

Authorities in Tulsa are releasing audio and video recordings showing the fatal police shooting of a black man whose SUV had stalled on a city street.

The footage is expected to be released during a news conference Monday afternoon.

Authorities haven't yet said whether 40-year-old Terence Crutcher had a weapon when he was shot Friday while reaching into his stalled SUV.

Authorities say the shooting occurred after an officer stopped to investigate the vehicle and that Crutcher approached after officers arrived to assist. Police spokeswoman Jeanne MacKenzie has said Crutcher refused orders to put up his hands.

Police say Tulsa Officer Betty Shelby fired the fatal shot, while Officer Tyler Turnbough used a stun gun on Crutcher.

The U.S. Department of Justice has been asked to help investigate the shooting.

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This story has been corrected to show that Crutcher's first name is spelled Terence, not Terrence.