Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop promoting at-home coffee enemas, but are they safe?

Gwyneth Paltrow has established herself as the go-to source for many outrageous and controversial products, so it usually comes as no surprise when her lifestyle website, Goop, touts something out of the ordinary.

But there’s one product in the recent annual detox guide that has caught people’s attention.

enema

Coffee enemas are reported to have unique health benefits, though there’s little research to back this claim and they can even be dangerous.  (Implantorama)

In its Beauty and Wellness Detox Guide, along with healthy recipes and expensive all-natural beauty products, there was something unexpected: a $135 Implant-O-Rama at-home coffee enema “for those who know what they’re doing.”

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In case you’ve never heard of a coffee enema, it’s not unlike a regular enema — a type of cleanse in which you insert liquid through the rectum into the colon, according to HealthLine. Coffee enemas are reported to have unique health benefits, though there’s little research to back this claim and they can even be dangerous.

According to the Implant-O-Rama website, “coffee enemas can mean relief from depression, confusion, general nervous tension, many allergy related symptoms and, most importantly, relief from severe pain” by detoxifying the body. But there have been numerous reported incidences of complications involving coffee enemas, including rectal burn from too hot of water, proctocolitis (inflammation of the rectum and colon) and even death, Huffington Post reports.

“Coffee enema has no proven benefit and carries considerable risk of provoking unwanted complications…it is certain that coffee enema should be reconsidered as an alternative treatment,” according to an article in The American Journal of Gastroenterology.

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This isn’t the first time Goop has promoted products with potentially harmful side effects. Previously the site has encouraged the use of vaginal steaming to clean the uterus and inserting a jade egg into the vagina to improve reproductive health, both of which were criticized by the medical field as unsafe and unnecessary. 

Michelle Gant is a writer and editor for Fox News Lifestyle. Follow her on Twitter @Michelleleegant