Nashville newspaper advertisement on end-of-world scenario launches investigation: report

An editor at a Nashville, Tenn. newspaper said he was “horrified” after a full-page advertisement paid for by a religious group predicting a terrorist attack on the city next month was published by the newspaper Sunday, The Associated Press reported Sunday.

The ad, the second this week by the group known as Future For America, claims Donald Trump “is the final president of the USA” and features a photo of Trump and Pope Francis. It begins by stating a nuclear device would be detonated in Nashville and the attack would be carried out by unspecific interests of “Islam.”

The ad violated the newspaper’s long-established standards banning hate speech, the AP reported.

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In the Wednesday ad, the group stated its intention to warn Nashville residents about next month's event “so that they may be able to make a decision intelligently.”

“The ad is horrific and is utterly indefensible in all circumstances. It is wrong, period, and should have never been published,” Vice President and Editor Michael A. Anastasi said. “It has hurt members of our community and our own employees and that saddens me beyond belief. It is inconsistent with everything The Tennessean as an institution stands and has stood for.”

The newspaper’s sales executives ordered the ad to be removed from future editions, the newspaper said.

Council on Islamic-American Relations spokesman Ibrahim Hooper explained while the group appreciates the “Islamophobic” ad was pulled and an investigation has begun, "we would urge the Tennessean to also implement updated policies and staff training to ensure that this type of hate incident does not occur in the future. CAIR is willing to offer that training,” the Associated Press reported.

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There was no indication how much Future for America paid for the ads, the report said. According to its website, the group's ministry warns of so-called end-of-the-world Bible prophecies whose fulfillment “is no longer future for it is taking place before our eyes.”

A telephone message left with Bonnerdale, Arkansas-based Future for America wasn’t immediately returned.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.