Church signs spread good words during coronavirus pandemic

Amid the coronavirus outbreak, churches are using their outside signage in creative ways.

From megachurches to the smallest congregations across the nation, the vast majority of religious institutions are meeting online and no longer in person after President Trump and the CDC recommended groups no larger than 10 gather for public or private events.

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The First Congregational Church of Farmington in New Hampshire shared a simple message.

In this March 19, 2020, photo, a church sign reminds townspeople to wash their hands as a car drives under Christmas lights along Main Street in Farmington, N.H. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

In this March 19, 2020, photo, a church sign reminds townspeople to wash their hands as a car drives under Christmas lights along Main Street in Farmington, N.H. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

The church put "Wash your hands" on their sign.

Other congregations are sharing messages in a more uniquely Christian way.

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"What would Jesus do?" the Lutheran Church of the Reformation in Washington, D.C., just steps from the Supreme Court, asked, harkening back to the WWJD-message of the '90s, amid efforts to slow the spread of coronavirus.

"He'd love his neighbor & wash his hands," the church writes.

Another congregation, just around the block from the Lutheran church, used its three lines to write, "Standing together, in solidarity, six feet apart."

Calvary Nazarene Church in Joplin, Mo., added a little snark to their "friendly reminder" message: "Jesus can wash away sin. But you've still got to wash your hands."

The First Christian Church in Maryville, Tenn., writes: "Church is who we are, not a place we go."

A sign displaying modified church services, due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, is posted over a signboard outside Mount Vernon Place Methodist Church in the Mount Vernon neighborhood of Washington, U.S., March 19, 2020. REUTERS/Tom Brenner - RC27NF9YU070

A sign displaying modified church services, due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, is posted over a signboard outside Mount Vernon Place Methodist Church in the Mount Vernon neighborhood of Washington, U.S., March 19, 2020. REUTERS/Tom Brenner - RC27NF9YU070

The Mount Vernon Place Methodist Church in Washington didn't have a chance to change the actual sign, but put another smaller sign atop writing, "COVID-19 update: In person worship is currently suspended."

An empty parking lot is reflected in the doors of Grace Bible Church Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Tempe, Ariz. Many houses of worship have suspended all in-person services and programs and moved to online services in compliance with CDC guidelines to promote social distancing in the effort to slow the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus. (AP Photo/Matt York)

An empty parking lot is reflected in the doors of Grace Bible Church Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Tempe, Ariz. Many houses of worship have suspended all in-person services and programs and moved to online services in compliance with CDC guidelines to promote social distancing in the effort to slow the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Whether the signs are taped to the door or written in block letters, each one is a sign of the times, where many congregations are forced to meet online and not in person for the first time.

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As Christians celebrate Lent, leading up to the holiest day of the calendar, Easter, on April 12, many are anticipating a different celebration than in previous years, but one thing is clear: the Gospel message hasn't changed.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.