Pittsburgh man explains how synagogue massacre spurred him to create uplifting design based on Steelers logo

One man created a special twist on the Pittsburgh Steelers logo after a mass shooting unfolded at a synagogue in the Steel City.

Tim Hindes, a full-time graphic designer and marketer, told Fox News: "I wanted it to be a symbol of remembrance, but more so, to be a message of hope. That we're together."

Hindes called the creation of the logo -- which includes the Star of David -- his "proudest moment to date."

He also shared the story behind the design in a lengthy Facebook post.

Hindes said he helped some friends move into their home before he looked on his phone — and saw there had been a shooting “at a synagogue a mile away from where we were packing.”

“My heart sunk,” he admitted. “Unfortunately, it wasn't because of the shooting, but because (I had feared) it was fueled by hate.”

Hindes explained that one of his friends recently had been the target of anti-Semitic verbal abuse.

“I had been disturbed by these events all week long and it seemed that I was seeing these same remarks now being played out in horrific fashion in front of me,” he wrote.

At one point, he said, he started to doodle.

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“Before it was the logo of a globally popular football team, the three diamonds were the seal of a product which helped develop the foundation of many cities across the globe--steel,” Hindes wrote. “Like Pittsburgh and its residents, steel is strong. It was a perfect basis for an image of hope.”

He added that it “was natural” for his take on the logo to feature the six-pointed star.

“The Jewish community is a thread throughout Pittsburgh's foundation and an important and diverse part of my fantastic city,” he shared.

Hindes also wrote about the strength of Pittsburgh’s residents, who he said “don’t get rattled easily.”

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“This fortitude was instilled in our community by our pierogi-pinching grandmothers,” he said. “We were strong before this tragedy. A tragedy like this just makes us stronger. Just like you can't break steel, you can't break the resiliency of a Pittsburgher. We are stronger than hate.”

Hindes concluded the post by saying he's praying for those killed, along with their families and the Squirrel Hill neighborhood.

“I hope this small symbol demonstrates that you are not alone in your mourning and that we all love you,” he wrote.

Fox News' Emilie Ikeda contributed to this report.