Thomas Cook guests continue to claim they're 'held hostage' at hotels

The fallout from the collapse of Thomas Cook continues to cause chaos for travelers.

Reports have surfaced of the former travel company’s customers complaining about being ‘held hostage’ by hotels demanding extra payment. Now, the UK Civil Aviation Authority is getting involved.

The CAA tweeted out a message to clarify the situation for travelers staying in hotels booked through Thomas Cook. It says, “We have given financial assurances to all hotels with ATOL protected #ThomasCook customers so they can remain in their hotel until they fly home. If you experience any difficulties with your hotel, please visit our website for support and advice.”

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After news broke of Thomas Cook’s financial situation, some hotel operators panicked that they would not be paid outstanding fees, Yahoo Finance reports. This apparently led them to try and force the guests to cover the charges.

On Sunday, it was reported that guests at the Les Orangers hotel in Tunisia claimed they were “being held hostage.” They claimed that the hotel had placed security guards at the gates and demanded that they pay extra fees due to the "Thomas Cook situation."

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In a statement obtained by Fox News before the company collapsed, a spokesperson said, “We are aware that a small number of customers were asked to pay for their hotel room before leaving Les Orangers in Tunisia yesterday. This has now been resolved and customers flew home as planned. We continue to support our customers in all our resorts.”

On Twitter, multiple users have complained about hotels across the world behaving in similar ways. Several tweets responding to the CAA announcement claim that hotels in Cuba, Thailand and Kissimmee, Fla., are holding guests on additional charges.

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Meanwhile, the CAA and the UK government are still working on repatriating thousands of British travelers affected by the Thomas Cook collapse, Yahoo Finance reports.