Why Was Michael Jackson Late to Trial?

This is a partial transcript from "On the Record," March 10, 2005, that has been edited for clarity.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BRIAN OXMAN, JACKSON FAMILY ATTORNEY: He tripped this morning and he fell in the early morning hours while he was getting dressed. His back is in terrible pain. He was in terrible discomfort during the entire trial proceedings. He's going to go home, recuperate, rest and relax, and he'll be back on Monday, and he's looking forward to being here.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He went to the emergency room.

OXMAN: And he went to the emergency room this morning, and he was given medications. So he'll be back on Monday. And we all thank you so very much.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRETA VAN SUSTEREN, HOST: That was one of Michael Jackson's lawyers outside the courthouse Thursday. Exactly why didn't Jackson show up on time? Joining us in Washington is Michael Jackson's spokesperson, Raymone Bain. Nice to see you.

RAYMONE BAIN, MICHAEL JACKSON SPOKESPERSON: Nice seeing you.

VAN SUSTEREN: Before we get to the events of today, when's the last time you spoke with Michael Jackson?

BAIN: About an hour-and-a-half ago.

VAN SUSTEREN: How was he?

BAIN: Not good.

VAN SUSTEREN: Meaning?

BAIN: He is in a lot of pain right now. His back is still very sore. And this morning, he couldn't move. He's moving a little better, but he is in excruciating pain.

VAN SUSTEREN: What happened?

BAIN: Well, I don't know exactly. At about 5:15 this morning, he began calling us to let us know he couldn't move — his attorneys, me, his brothers, his family. And it was advised that he go to the emergency room.

VAN SUSTEREN: Let me stop you there. Is 5:15 the normal time he would get up to go to court?

BAIN: He gets up at 4:30.

VAN SUSTEREN: OK.

BAIN: And he had begun, you know, getting dressed for court because his home is probably, if you're driving the regular speed limit, about 50 minutes away.

VAN SUSTEREN: How much sleep has he been getting during this trial?

BAIN: Well, some days he gets quite a bit, and other days he doesn't. I mean, he's like either you or I. You know, this has been very stressful, what he has gone through actually the entire year. There's been one thing after the other, and he has had to contend with so much. And there have been all of these rumors and so many things. In the last couple of days, I've even had to deal with the reports that his staff walked off. And that's not true at all.

VAN SUSTEREN: All right. So he was taken to the hospital. Was this by ambulance or by his staff?

BAIN: By security, yes.

VAN SUSTEREN: And what did they say at the hospital to him?

BAIN: I don't know exactly what they said, but I do know that he was given medication for his back. He couldn't move.

VAN SUSTEREN: Do you know what it was?

BAIN: I don't know it. I think it was some kind of muscle relaxant.

VAN SUSTEREN: Did you get the sense that it affected his judgment or that he was the least bit foggy? He looked in disarray when he arrived at the courthouse — at least, watching through the television screen.

BAIN: I'm sure you or I would have been in a little disarray, too, because you wake up, you're preparing your day as normal, you can't move. You're advised to go to the emergency room. Then you're told that there's a bench warrant out for your arrest. So I mean, I would look a little discombobulated, too, if I were arriving into court.

VAN SUSTEREN: You've got to be able to understand the proceedings going on about you in order for a trial to proceed. Did you get the sense that the medication is affecting his judgment or his ability to...

BAIN: No, because he was able to relate to me everything that he heard and give me his opinions of how he felt the court proceedings went today. He's just in a lot of pain. And most people whom I know who suffer from back spasms and back pains and conditions, it's excruciating.

VAN SUSTEREN: Is this common, or is the first time it's happened with him?

BAIN: Well, now, there have been times when his back has given out on him. If you recall during that interview with Ed Bradley, he'd indicated that sometimes he has recurring back problems. When he was performing over in Munich, Germany, several years ago, the bridge that he was performing on collapsed and it fell on him. So he has some recurring problems. I'm not going to say that this is a recurring injury or whether it was stress-related.

VAN SUSTEREN: But not the first time.

BAIN: It's not the first time.

VAN SUSTEREN: Raymone, thank you very much for joining us. I appreciate it.

BAIN: And thank you.

Watch "On the Record" weeknights at 10 p.m. ET

Content and Programming Copyright 2005 FOX News Network, L.L.C. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Transcription Copyright 2005 eMediaMillWorks, Inc. (f/k/a Federal Document Clearing House, Inc.), which takes sole responsibility for the accuracy of the transcription. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No license is granted to the user of this material except for the user's personal or internal use and, in such case, only one copy may be printed, nor shall user use any material for commercial purposes or in any fashion that may infringe upon FOX News Network, L.L.C.'s and eMediaMillWorks, Inc.'s copyrights or other proprietary rights or interests in the material. This is not a legal transcript for purposes of litigation.