Democratic presidential candidates reveal their extreme climate agenda

This is a rush transcript from "The Five," September 6, 2019. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

JUAN WILLIAMS, CO-HOST: Hello, everyone. I'm Juan Williams along with Emily Compagno, Jesse Watters, Dagen McDowell, and Brian Kilmeade is here today. It's 5 o'clock in New York City, and this is "The Five."

The gun control debate set to take over Washington, President Trump and Democratic Senator Joe Manchin meeting this week to bridge the party's divide. But it looks like both sides are ready to dig in for a protractive fight. Trump reportedly saying he's willing to get something done with Democrats, but he's also insisting that he'll defend second amendment rights.

This all comes as the Justice Department has sent a gun legislation proposal, a package of ideas to the White House for consideration. The details of the plan unclear for the moment. For Democrats, well, 2020 candidates are taking a much different approach when it comes to gun control.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JOE BIDEN, DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: The idea that we don't have elimination of assault-type weapons, magazines that can hold multiple bullets in them is absolutely mindless.

BETO O'ROURKE, DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: This is (BLEEP). We have to change this or it is on all of us.

SEN. BERNIE SANDERS, DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: That we should ban the sale and distribution of assault weapons in this country, which I think is the right thing to do.

MAYOR BILL DE BLASIO, DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: I think if there was a ban on assault weapons, and there was a buyback program, the vast majority of people, I think, would do the smart thing and they would sell them back.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WILLIAMS: Well, so now the question is, what is a good idea here? Jesse, do you have any ideas? I mean, my criticism --

JESSE WATTERS, CO-HOST: Ever?

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: Just on this?

WILLIAMS: Just on this one, Jesse.

WATTERS: OK.

WILLIAMS: But -- you know, my criticism would be that I don't see any good ideas so far coming from the Trump White House. They clearly have been, you know, bollix by the NRA's refusal to look at background checks.

WATTERS: Well, a lot of people want to do something, right? But they don't know what that is. I mean, I want to do something. I just want that something to be constitutional, and actually stem the tide of mass shootings, and that's pretty much it. But there's a sweet spot there, where you cannot infringe on people second amendment rights, and stop these mass killings. What we're hearing from the left are two things. One, the assault weapons ban. Now, there's no such thing as an assault weapon. That's a fake phrase. All it is, is a regular rifle with stylize military features. But it still acts as a regular semiautomatic, you aim, you squeeze, and one round goes through.

I don't understand, even if you did ban that, which you can't, how that would stop people from mass shootings? It doesn't. The other thing is the buyback and the mandatory confiscation. The mandatory confiscation is illegal. That would cause a mass insurrection in this country, and the buyback, if it's voluntary, I don't have a problem with it. If people want to sell their guns to the feds, that's fine with me. It seems like a waste of money, but if they want to do that, that's fine.

What I believe is what we need to do is -- and Dave Chappelle talked about this on his special the other day. If your son goes on a mass shooting, and then you get out there and the cameras the next day and you say, I had no idea. Johnny was such a great kid. I have no idea. But the kid is going to school looking like a vampire, he's locking his door every night on crazy websites, you don't even go in to explore his bedroom. You go and there's an arsenal. And how do you not know? And then the school, secondarily, if this kid is disruptive, if he's violent and you're just slapping him on the wrist, if the counselors aren't getting involved, and you're not sharing information with the other state agencies, then you guys are at fault.

So you have to stem this thing at the core, and then not just throw away the constitution in order to achieve a political agenda.

WILLIAMS: Well, Emily, in fact, you know, I think there's a lot of urgency around this. We've had terrible shootings, obviously, before Newtown and the children. But in the month of August, 38 Americans slain in mass shootings, Dayton, El Paso, West Texas. There's a sense that something needs to be done, but Senator McConnell, the senate majority leader says I'm not doing anything until I hear from President Trump, and President Trump, so far, not doing anything. What would you do?

EMILY COMPAGNO, GUEST CO-HOST: Well, I think for Senator McConnell that was -- that's strategic in nature that he's trying to get something accomplished. And so, he's kind of recognizing the procedure that's in place. I -- every single one of those deaths was absolutely tragic. But the issue that I have with all of these proposals coming from the left is the fact that they are all ineffective and reactionary. And they are treating the symptom, not the problem. We have an epidemic of people, and especially young people that are killing themselves and killing others because of mental health issues and to garner social media accolades.

And this kind of off-kilter national conversation and totally skewed proposal for confiscation and registries that just fosters and feeds it. And in terms of the buyback and what is essentially is the confiscation, for that to actually work, which in no way would it, and even de Blasio admits, well, the vast majority would be taken back. But all it takes is one person to have it not work for, and then that creates -- has the potential for creating deaths.

But the issue is, when you get into the specifics, they are so many loopholes. There are 20 million in estimated, semiautomatic large capacity rifles in the country and half a million are produced each year, and only a portion of those guns are serialized. So how do you regulate or account for the rest of it? How do you handle the person-to-person universal background checks? Would we then include family members like Sandy Hook?

There are so many questions that this entire thing begs, that for me all it does is skirt the real issue which is the mental health and sickness of this society. It's the symptoms only, and it's because our government is too lazy to address, and the legislators are too lazy to address identifying those bad actors before it happens, and instead they're infringing on our constitutional rights.

WILLIAMS: Dagen, so what you hear from Emily is a focus on mental health. And I've got to tell you, I'm very skeptical about this, because I think there are lots of people with mental health issues who are not mass shooters, and certainly other countries have people with mental health issues and they don't have the kind of mass slaying that we see in this country. But that is coming in large part now as President Trump and others saying, oh, it's a mental health issue. How do you react?

DAGEN MCDOWELL, GUEST CO-HOST: Well, I think one thing that could move forward are -- at least the Senator Lindsey Graham proposal, which I think he's teamed up with Blumenthal on -- in terms of red flag laws in this country, and there's a lot of concern about due process with them. But what Senator Graham wants to do is to simply give a grant to the state that wants to put these laws in place. They've only been around, the first one was implemented in the state of Connecticut, still had the Sandy Hook shooting after it in 1999.

So there's not a lot of research on how they're implemented, and if people's rights, not only to own a gun, but privacy rights are honored in them. Nevertheless, that's one way to give law enforcement and even family members the ability to get a gun. There's 17 states with them now in D.C. Get a gun out of a hand of somebody who is a threat to them.

But to Emily's point, the mental -- they like to basically point the finger, the left does at the NRA. The NRA represents a small slice of the 55 million-plus gun owners in this country. Law-abiding citizens. Let's point the finger at the mental health lobby, because, again, mental health spending has gone up in this country, what, 60 percent in the last decade, has that helped? It's a right. It's a guaranteed right under Obamacare. Has that helped? Mental health counselling.

And if you look at the number -- there was a secret service report that came out in July of this year, 27 attacks, 91 deaths, 107 injuries on mass attacks, 67 percent, more than two-thirds of those suspects displayed signs of mental illness or emotional disturbance, and 93 percent of the incidents of people showed a history of troubling communication. And you know what? We haven't done anything about it because the left is afraid of the mental health lobby.

WILLIAMS: I don't think that's right, but I'll grant the point. But I just want to move on, Brian, and say what we're seeing now is that, you know, it's major retailers like Walgreens, CVS --

BRIAN KILMEADE, GUEST CO-HOST: Walmart.

WILLIAMS: Walmart, I should say. Wegmans are joining Walmart and Kroger in telling customers not to carry weapons openly.

KILMEADE: Oh, yeah, not openly carry but bring them in concealed. That's a minor point. Most people say, OK, I understand it.

WILLIAMS: Let me say, not minor to the NRA. They're up in arms about this.

KILMEADE: Well, put it this way, if a shooter is going to walk into a Walmart, they've got to know that in certain states they can carry, so they know they're going to get this horrible thing called being shot back at, which most of these guys are cowards anyway. In terms of the actual X's and O's in terms of the politics of it, here's what Trump is looking at, 29 separate proposals. Here's what he's willing to do, death penalty immediately for a fast track for the mass shooter, release the records of troubled teens and bring them into the adult age so they will not going to pass a background check like what happened in Dayton.

WATTERS: I like that.

KILMEADE: I like that, too. Requiring the FBI to notify the authorities when someone fails a background check immediately. Hey, you try for a gun, it failed, let's go knock on that -- it's usually not women, let's go knock on that guy's door. What they are trying to do, what I'm encouraged by is the president is talking to Manchin and Murphy, Senator Murphy of Connecticut, what I'm encouraged by to me is talking to the president who's talking to Lindsey Graham.

I hope that they will not go into their separate corners like they usually do and just start yelling at each other. They get a few things passed that they think they're addressing this. The other think I like this do, see a table like this, maybe a little bigger with psychological experts and forensic experts to look at the last 25 shootings. Sadly, you only have to go back three years, and say what happened? What are the commonalities? Have the politicians in the back row. What are the commonalities? This is our report. But unlike Simpson Bowles, I want something done out of this report.

And then when it's done, get experts, not politicians, to decide how to keep the kids safe in school, the shoppers safe at Walmart, and others allowed to go to a bar without being shot at, or go to a movie without being executed.

MCDOWELL: And remind people that owning a gun is a constitutional right in this country, which a lot of people seems to forget.

WILLIAMS: Well, I'll tell you what, I think they're too many guns in this country, and I think that's one common element in all of these shooters is easy access to firearms. But this is a discussion not only at the family table, now is getting at the White House. We'll see if something comes of it. Dramatic new details in the tragic California boat fire, so many dead. How are the owners now trying to fend off lawsuits? And what happened right after that inferno erupted? You will see it here on The Five.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

MCDOWELL: New details in that tragic dive boat fire that killed 34 people off the coast of California. The owners now filing a federal lawsuit in an attempt to avoid having to pay the victim's families, and investigators revealing what happened just moments after the boat burst into flames. William La Jeunesse is in Santa Barbara with the latest. William?

WILLIAM LA JEUNESSE, FOX NEWS: Well, Dagen, the dive teams are still trying to salvage what is left of the boat, to bring it out of the water for investigators, and they have the barge here now to do it from Los Angeles, but the winds are kicking up over the weekend, so that could be postponed until Monday. Also, cause and origin of the fire remain unknown, but an area of concern, the dining area where passengers charge their cell phones and their cameras. Bad wiring and overloaded circuit, overheated batteries, we don't know. Thirty three out of thirty four bodies recovered, 18 identified so far.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: All of the recovered remains have suffered varying degrees of fire damage, which requires DNA analysis to confirm the identities of the victims.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

LA JEUNESSE: While the owner defends his crew, he also filed a limited liability claim in federal court on Thursday, denying any financial exposure or responsibility.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Captain Jerry who remains on the boat as long as he possibly could, trying to get those radio calls in. Within minutes they would have been consumed, so they did their best.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

LA JEUNESSE: So based on crew accounts, officials say passengers had no chance of surviving, because of the boats layout and design, no one heard a working smoke alarm, and reportedly the boat had no night watchman, which is required by cove. Now the ATF has brought in their national response team to try to, again, determine the cause, which is why bringing up that boat is so important. Also the autopsies will begin to tell us cause of death and how long -- or how long they did not have to live. Dagen?

MCDOWELL: Thank you. William La Jeunesse in California for us. Emily, the fact that the owners of this boat have already filed a lawsuit using a 19 -- excuse me, 1851 statute to try to avoid liability in the case, isn't that just kind of appalling?

COMPAGNO: Right. It doesn't sit well at all, certainly with the public, and definitely not with the victim's families. It goes back -- it goes back to the time, basically, in the shipping industry when they couldn't obtain insurance, except now the insurance company use it as a regular practice, they deploy immediately after catastrophes like this to essentially save their own hide and protect their interests, because they're the one (INAUDIBLE) the defenses and also, potentially, the payouts.

But, obviously, optically, it's really terrible, and it's only been a few days. The owners of the death boat catastrophe, they used it. And, obviously, we've heard on the news, the Titanic and whatnot. But, yes, it's a very archaic lob. But I think what it does, if it's successful, is that it means that instead of filling state courts suits, the victims' families, it directs everything to federal court, and it limits the owners liability to hear what they're arguing, which is zero.

And that's really difficult for these victims' families to hear that the cost of these lives is just zero. But it's not a fail-safe. So the owners would have to prove that their company is not to blame, and the victims' families are essentially proving the owners knew or should have known, which is a negligence standard for them to -- for them to prevail and for the petition not to work.

WILLIAMS: So, to me, that's what this is about, right? Negligence. Were they negligent --

KILMEADE: Yeah.

WILLIAMS: -- or were they not negligent? And it scares me, by the way, the idea that you would be asleep underneath a boat and there's no exit, and a fire on the surface, that's very scary. But I wanted to ask you because this week there was a verdict in that ghost fire case out in California, and the guy who put on this warehouse event, apparently with limited exits, was found not guilty. No negligence.

COMPAGNO: So, that state law in California and essentially what prosecutors charge those two defendants with is that the negligence standard was such a hype -- it was so reckless, a reckless disregard for human life that it was criminal. So they were charging him with criminal negligence versus here what we're talking about just for this moment is civil negligence. And as you've said, one was acquitted, and the other -- it's a hard bar to cross.

KILMEADE: The fact that the boat is worthless means that there will be no money to pay out if this holds up. But did they go ahead and brief the crew and give that speech of this -- what do you do in case of a fire. The night watchman is one other element of it. They also say in talking to the crew members, one reporter said at about 2:35, one crew member went to the bottom, they clean up in the area, and made sure the stove was cold. Somewhere between 2:35 and 3:15, there was a fire. And the guy went -- one of the crew member went down, they couldn't get past the second level, so all these people were basically being suffocated or burned alive on top. So that's how quick it happen.

So as they put this together, if they find out all these things are there, it's hard for me to believe that these families wouldn't have a case.

WATTERS: I think they have a great case. And the guy who owns the company has to do what he has to do to save-off bankruptcy and protect his assets. He might be the villain, obviously, but, listen, he's just trying to save money so he can have a nice retirement. Didn't look good, but that's what you would do if that was the situation you were in. These guys were tested for drugs and alcohol. It looks like they were sober. But in my opinion, they were cowards. From what we know, they didn't spend as much time as they should have staying with the ship and doing all they could to save one life. Not only was there poor planning from this, but there was poor execution after the fire went down. And from what we heard over those calls, it looked like they've got the hell out of there pretty fast.

MCDOWELL: In this poultry little way to investigate, whether these operations are up to snuff or not. Meantime, Democrats promising to save the planet by declaring war on hamburgers. And Bernie loses it on a crying baby. That much more in the 2020 round up, straight-ahead.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WATTERS: It's time now for our 2020 round up. First up, if you thought Democrats' extreme climate agenda couldn't get any crazier, think again. Here's a new one. If you eat meat or use plastic straws, you're to blame for killing the planet, so says Mayor Pete.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MAYOR PETE BUTTIGIEG, DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: I think we think about it mostly through the perspective of guilt, you know, from using a straw, to eating a burger, am I part of the problem? In a certain way, yes. But the most exciting thing is we can all be part of the solution.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WATTERS: So exciting. And then there's New York City's disastrous mayor, Bill de Blasio, going head-to-head with Tucker over his climate hypocrisy.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TUCKER CARLSON, FOX NEWS: How can you take an SUV to the gym and back every day and say that you're really worried about climate change? I know it's a petty question.

MAYOR BILL DE BLASIO, DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: It's a Chrysler Pacifica. It's a Pacifica. It's a hybrid electric. It's not a SUV, first of all.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WATTERS: Brian, it's a Pacifica.

KILMEADE: Right, exactly. But the SUVs that follow him, unbelievable. I thought it was just so interesting to see Mayor de Blasio pointing. I give him credit for going on, number one. Number two, is he wants to owners -- made it pretty clear at the end. Number two is I think the -- actually, might be number three when I look back at the tape after the show. I think in the end --

WATTERS: You watch your performance afterwards?

KILMEADE: Yes, I judge myself. Most of the time I give myself an A-plus. It's still out of my time when I go evaluate my appearance. So back to my original point is --

WATTERS: Which is what?

KILMEADE: -- seven hours of that marathon was probably the best thing that happened to Trump 2020 --

WATTERS: I agree.

KILMEADE: -- by far. And the thing is these people throw things out, all these candidates throw things out, they have no plan to execute. And when he was pushed on his plan on the buyback plan because they wouldn't do that, he goes, we don't know how we're going to do it. Who gave you the right -- you're going to go tell law enforcements -- you basically told to stay on the side, I want -- now go into that house and go grab their AK-47. It's not going to happen.

WATTERS: Not a great plan. Dagen?

MCDOWELL: I want these lefties get called out as immoral basically to reduce the standard of living for every American by trying to ban fossil fuels in this country. Call it immoral. Call them what they are. They're part of the problem, not the solution.

WATTERS: oh, Juan, that's tough talk from Dagen. Are you going to let that stand?

MCDOWELL: It's immoral.

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: I know. I'm going to go to church on Sunday. But to me --

KILMEADE: Father Pete.

WILLIAMS: What's that?

KILMEADE: Father -- Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

WILLIAMS: Is he now a reverend?

KILMEADE: He talks to God.

WILLIAMS: Is that right? OK. Because to me, I must be immoral because to me it's the idea is we can limit consumption, right? We can limit generating these kinds of carbon deaths as it goes into the atmosphere and warm everything. I don't see anything wrong with that. I just don't see any real ideas about this from the right. And so, then the left comes with ideas and everyone says, oh, wait a second, you're trying to control me. President Trump is raising astounding amounts of money by making a culture war issues, buy a Trump straw, so that's his idea?

WATTERS: An idea isn't good just because it's an idea. Sometimes there's dumb ideas. --

WILLIAMS: Correct.

WATTERS: And your side is full of dumb ideas. Making sure everybody goes vegetarian.

WILLIAMS: The worst idea, no idea.

COMPAGNO: Half of it is the delivery, too. Like, does anyone realize that when you hand thing out in (INAUDIBLE) you're going to be punish? Of course, I'm going to retaliate by eating ten burgers today. De Blasio is such a poster child to for the kind of like Hollywood elitist double standard, which is essentially I'm going to give lip service to all these ideas, but I'm going to carve out an exception for me and everything in my world --

(CROSSTALK)

MCDOWELL: Can I say one thing? We have reduced CO2 emissions in this country. We've done a better job than any nation in the world, quite frankly. We're back to the 85 level.

WILLIAMS: Yes, we're the richest --

MCDOWELL: So stop talking about like we're all evil and we're not doing anything.

WATTERS: Look what you're doing to poor Dagen.

WILLIAMS: I know.

WATTERS: All right. Up next, could it be another rig Democratic primary? Some 2020 Democrats are furious after being cut from next week's debate and are ripping the DNC over the process.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

REP. TULSI GABBARD, DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: Setting this requirement that you've got to be popular or famous if you're going to be qualified to serve as president. To me that does a disservice to voters. So, you know, I think that we can raise our voices to call in the DNC to be more transparent and reassess how they're choosing which polls they're using.

TOM STEYER, DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: No one has run a poll of the Democratic national community would accept for like five weeks. So I don't have to change anything. All they have to do is run a poll that the DNC will accept.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WATTERS: So, Juan, sore losers, complainers, or they have a point?

WILLIAMS: They have no point. The DNC has been very transparent. The rules were set, everybody knew. You had to get this number, I think it was 130,000 small donors, you had to reach 2 percent in four polls. I don't get it. But you know what, most people who had dropped out, they don't have a complain and the people who remain, they're still in looking to try to meet those requirements to get in the October debate. I think their complain is sour--

WATTERS: Kind of like the Electoral College. The rules were set. You knew the rules. You've got to play by the rules, don't complain after--

WILLIAMS: But let's change the rules.

WATTERS: Yes, let's change the rules.

KILMEADE: There you go.

COMPAGNO: Yes, exactly. I think it's deeply ironic that that billionaire environmental activist is basically complaining he can't buy his way onto the DNC. DNC Democratic debate stage.

MCDOWELL: $325,000 a day, Tom Steyer spent on campaign advertising. So, money doesn't control politics.

WATTERS: Lot of crumbs. That's good point.

KILMEADE: All right. With the time I have, I'd like to say this.

WATTERS: Yes. You're wasting it.

KILMEADE: The only person who had a good point is Tulsi Gabbard. She should have got a mulligan for this, because for two weeks when the criteria - when she was in the final two weeks to get higher in two more polls, she got stationed I think Indonesia as a National Guardsman.

I think you should just say you know what, clearly, you're confident. You have a lot of ideas. You were on a roll. I think that if you have to go serve for two weeks, I would say if I was competing with her, I'd say you belong in this.

WATTERS: Yes. They should have made an exception.

WILLIAMS: Well, I don't know, it sounds like that cranky baby.

WATTERS: Speaking of--

KILMEADE: What cranky baby?

WATTERS: Finally, we all know Bernie Sanders, bit of a crotchety socialist kind of guy, but he's now taking things to a whole new level. Watch.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

SEN. BERNIE SANDERS, DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: Right. Did I hear you correctly say that you have to cut your pills and half for your son? OK. If we could keep that down a little bit. OK. Thanks.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KILMEADE: You know what--

WATTERS: I love it.

KILMEADE: He's 100 percent right. That kid has got to calm down. He's speaking.

WILLIAMS: What are you talking about?

KILMEADE: You cannot bring a screaming baby to a political event. He's trying to be President. He's trying to get--

WATTERS: Kiss that baby, Brian.

KILMEADE: Quiet it down. I think she's going to cut her pills in half.

MCDOWELL: I want that dude to be my sidekick in every restaurant I go into.

KILMEADE: The baby or Bernie.

WATTERS: Bernie.

MCDOWELL: Bernie.

WATTERS: What do you think?

WILLIAMS: Well, I think Bernie is clearly not, I feel your pain kind of guy.

KILMEADE: No.

WILLIAMS: Cranky. I mean this is so rude. I don't even know what to say about it.

KILMEADE: So, terrible.

WATTERS: Yes. Stick a pacifier in its mouth.

COMPAGNO: He's such an Ebenezer. I mean when is he going to stop being the face of like forward progression. He's clearly not and I love that it was instant. It wasn't even like 30 seconds of, it was instant that he was like you shut that baby.

KILMEADE: But that's what parents used to be. They used to tell kids to be quiet and sit in the corner. That's the old days.

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: Babies do not feel the burden. Liberals targeting and shaming Trump supporters reaching epic proportions. Who they're now going after next, until you see this?

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KILMEADE: Everybody welcome back. Trump supporters around the country continue to face an onslaught of public shaming just this week. President Trump smacking down Will and Grace star Debra Messing for saying his donors should be outed. And now we have another outrageous example. Get this.

You have a liberal author taking to Twitter to tell people to avoid wearing any type of Red Hat. "Is anyone else made really uncomfortable these days by anyone wearing any kind of red baseball cap like the St. Louis Cardinals." How dare they. Maybe they don't wear red caps anymore, normal people. Also, for the love of God, the clever folks wearing Make America Read Again or whatever caps, no, you're making everyone scared. Don't do it. Banning red caps. Is this an idea whose time has come? Jesse Watters.

WATTERS: Liberals are so soft, Kilmeade.

KILMEADE: What's going on.

WATTERS: I mean they can't handle a hat. They get upset when you eat a hamburger. They don't want you to drive somewhere. They want to make sure your house is properly insulated. Stay out of my house, stay out of my kitchen. Stay out of my closet.

KILMEADE: Right.

WATTERS: They're always saying stay out of our bedroom. Well, get out of my closet. Hey, I can't wear my Phillies cap, because it's going to trigger some liberal. Come on, man.

KILMEADE: Dagen, does this kind of ridiculousness that's really over the top really bring people back down to earth and make it realize we're overreacting.

MCDOWELL: So, they're angry about red hats. So, by extension they hate Santa Claus. And they hate Mrs. Claus.

KILMEADE: Yes.

MCDOWELL: And I wouldn't want to make anybody from Philadelphia wear a red- -

WATTERS: We're already making you scared.

MCDOWELL: You know who makes me more frightened? Red Sox fans. Do not bring on the wrath of a Red Sox--

KILMEADE: But you know - this is what they put it out.

WATTERS: What about the Redskins? Or the Washington football team.

KILMEADE: Juan, are you triggered when you see a red cap. You're a sports fan.

WILLIAMS: Well, I'm a big Washington Nationals fan, so you know we're standing on the Washington Nationals, we wear red hats. In fact, even the Capitals have a thing about get your red on in Washington.

So, I mean to me this is kind of nuts. But do I understand what she's saying. Yes, I do because I think there are lots of people who like to troll liberals and I think there are the people who don't even perceive that hat that Make America Great Again hat, what it says to people of color, what it says to immigrants, what it says to a lot of women in this country. It's threatening.

WATTERS: Wait, Juan. How is that threatening? It's a hat.

WILLIAMS: Are you kidding? The kind of intolerance, the kind of things that we've seen take place in this country everything from Charlotte's--

WATTERS: We're Making America Great Again.

WILLIAMS: Oh! Yes. Right.

WATTERS: That's probably what upsets them. The greatness.

WILLIAMS: Forget the politics. It's not the politics. It's that you are intentionally sending a very divisive message. But I think some people don't even perceive it. They don't understand how this--

KILMEADE: I will take your latter point. Emily, I don't think people perceive the way Juan perceives it. COMPAGNO: Well, clearly that one woman does. Look, I'm all for eliminating minor scare (ph). But to me, I am like you know what keep it up, keep it up because all this is going to do is galvanize everyone else because now it's been over into the normal fandom who are like, what are you talking about.

And to me the hypocrisy again of Hollywood where everyone there all the actors have in their little Twitter bios. I'm an activist. And then what's her face Debra Messing. She tweeted out a black vote for Trump is mental illness. She later apologized. But if I were to say that on this show, if someone were to say that--

KILMEADE: Or retweeted.

COMPAGNO: Yes, exactly.

WATTERS: Well, they called Kanye West mentally ill.

COMPAGNO: Exactly. And somehow, they're self-label--

KILMEADE: Exactly.

COMPAGNO: Activist.

KILMEADE: Juan, has it occurred to you that he says, Make America Great Again and now keep America great that he's talking about the eight years of President Obama and the apology tour and the acquiescence on the world stage and the retraction of the American dream and pride around the globe. Not a back to slavery and pre-civil war talk. Has it occurred to you?

WILLIAMS: I think it was back to 1950s and women in their place.

KILMEADE: But he has never said that. He's never--

WILLIAMS: No, I just think that's what comes through.

WATTERS: It's the 80s, Juan. The 80s.

WILLIAMS: Look I think you guys - I think you see this as controlling. I think again, we're an American family. We're a community of people. I don't think that we should be intentionally offending somebody who just thinks that oh you know I had some fun, I really gave it to Jesse. You know it's just that's juvenile.

MCDOWELL: But that's what you're bringing to the table, you think that somebody wearing a MAGA hat because they voted for President Trump is doing it to offend you.

WILLIAMS: Correct.

MCDOWELL: And to frighten you--

WATTERS: They're proud of the hat.

MCDOWELL: That is a steaming pile of horse hooey and you know it, Juan.

WILLIAMS: No, I don't. I just tell you how I felt and that was legit.

WATTERS: But now - but you're right. But now that people know that it upsets people when they see a red hat like you said earlier about the hamburgers, they're just going to wear their red hats more.

KILMEADE: I think we've got to - that was the - Whoopi Goldberg was a breaking point I think people are going to start respecting people. My hope is from here on and say just because we might vote differently, we're not going to boycott. It's going to stop right here. That's my hope. No one believes me. All right. 90 minutes before the top of the hour. Tom Brady tells us if soccer star Carli Lloyd at 38 years old can kick in the NFL why men could be to blame for declining marriage rates. And do parents love pets more than their kids. These stories up next in the Fastest 7 unless we run out of time. It'll be six, five or--

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

COMPAGNO: Welcome back. Time for the Fastest 7. First up, soccer star Carli Lloyd's football kicking skulls have been igniting a fierce debate for weeks over she could play in the NFL. Patriots quarterback Tom Brady is finally weighing in.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TOM BRADY, PATRIOTS QUARTERBACK: I think you know if you're good enough to do it and you know the teams wanted to explore that, everyone should have an opportunity. It's a very highly competitive game and you know it's hard to find good players, it certainly hard to find good kickers.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

COMPAGNO: Yes, he's right. So, OK, I looked up the stats and apparently in the last from 2017 through Thursday night's game, regular season games only, the average is 60 percent of getting field goals that were 55 yards and higher. But that being said, she took like 30 steps and in a real game you can only take one. So, what do you guys think?

WATTERS: That's true. Well, listen, if she can split the uprights behind 50 yards, I say sign her. But I don't really care what kind of genitalia the leg is attached to. Men, women, if they can put it through the uprights and they can win the game for the Eagles. Give it to me. Give it to me.

But you know what if she does do kickoffs then players are going to go after her and probably level her. So, maybe just stick to field goals and extra points.

KILMEADE: Are we live? I'm a little concerned about this. OK. All right.

WATTERS: I'm a women's right activist.

WILLIAMS: Is that right.

WATTERS: I am defending women.

WILLIAMS: Wow. I'm glad you said that.

KILMEADE: Dagen, go ahead. Sorry. I felt like you were about talk.

MCDOWELL: I actually do.

KILMEADE: All right, I'm not. I know Carli Lloyd, she's one of the finest athletes in the country at 38 years old, she's still on the World Cup team. But my problem is, if that kick is blocked or there is a fake, you're going to have 350-pound guys going after 135-pound woman. And if you're a guy, I am not hitting her. And I'm just saying that it's not fair to her. And at 38 to start kicking.

WILLIAMS: No. Hang on, but there are rules in the game just like rules that protect Tom Brady. There are rules that protect kickers.

KILMEADE: Not when the ball is five.

WILLIAMS: But I'm telling you--

WATTERS: If there is a turnover, if there is a run back, she's going to get sunk.

WILLIAMS: But where field goal kickers get hurt and by the way, she kicked it through 50 yards, not only taking extra steps, there weren't the 350 pound guys and attention coming at her. But once the way that field goal kickers get hurt is that they get roughed and there are rules against that they will protect her. KILMEADE: As soon as that ball is blocked, you'll get to knock her out of the way you do it.

MCDOWELL: I hate Tom Brady by the way.

KILMEADE: I find him sexy.

COMPAGNO: OK. Up next, you may be wondering why people aren't getting hitched as much anymore. Well sorry guys. Scientists think you may be to blame. A new study shows marriage rates are declining because there just aren't as many "economically attractive men" for women to meet.

My favorite part about the study was the use of words like synthetic husbands and like dream husbands. And then meanwhile the guy that doctor that was in-charge of the whole thing was like, it's just an economic transaction. I think the whole thing is kind of weird.

WATTERS: Well, I don't know what a synthetic husband does. I hope I'm not one of them, but I think men provide a certain package for women. You could be good looking. You could be funny. You could be rich. It doesn't have to be all of those things, you can be ugly and rich, women like that. Maybe you could be really good looking and be broke. Women can also like that. But if you're not good looking, you're not funny and you're broke. You're not going to go out on any dates.

MCDOWELL: I will take broke and ugly, if you can change a tire, rebuild a car engine, fade away date or fix the dishwasher.

WATTERS: Your handy.

MCDOWELL: And do stuff that the modern man pays some other dude to do.

KILMEADE: This--

MCDOWELL: Again, no man.

COMPAGNO: Real man.

KILMEADE: Not like me. Yes, this study reveals that if a guy is wearing cologne, getting his look down, jogging, working out, working his abs, checking himself out the mirror, trying to be a good person, it doesn't matter. It's all about your wallet. And I find that relatively discouraging. I don't know women say, they want to know on your first date how much you are worth, not how much you work out, how long - you know what kind of person you are.

I think this study reveals something very disturbing about America that it's all about the money. WATTERS: First of all, are you calling women shallow?

KILMEADE: This study shows that women only care about money.

WILLIAMS: No.

KILMEADE: Economically challenged. I can read between the lines.

WILLIAMS: OK, so I read this a little differently. I think in the old days maybe women were looking for somebody who would support them, so they didn't have to work their whole lives support the kids.

I think now with modern women they want a partner who's not going to drag them down, but they want to support, someone who is going to allow them to prosper in their careers, Brian. Allow them to go up without having feeling that someone is so economically unstable that they may be a hindrance to their progress.

MCDOWELL: We just tell people to fix stuff, we want a dude, who knows how to fix stuff.

COMPAGNO: OK. And finally, we all know pets are part of the family, but this next story is surprising. A new study shows 34 percent of parents prefer their furry friends over their own kids. Of course, I like their pets better than their kids too.

WATTERS: I think this is when they're asked you know which kid do you like, like Jimmy or Nancy, they don't want to choose to create problems and they just pick Fluffy.

COMPAGNO: Diplomacy.

WATTERS: Diplomacy.

MCDOWELL: And you know what, when you spoil your dog, the dog is still awesome. When you spoil your kid, you raise Debra Messing.

WATTERS: Oh! The Mess.

KILMEADE: I do think I agree with Jesse. I do think that this study is somewhat tongue in cheek to think that people are picking their German shepherd over their German child is a little bit disturbing, but I do think there is one thing charming about pets when kids get older they have attitudes they don't feel appreciated sometimes, sometimes they do, sometimes they don't.

The pets are consistent. They're always happy to see you. Always amazed when you come home. I can't believe you're there. We miss that. When they're little, the kids are so happy to see you coming and going, right. And with dogs they never change.

WATTERS: Your kids--

KILMEADE: I've got to credit the pet industry for raising good animals.

WILLIAMS: Is that it? What about if you raised good kids. I love kids and I love my kids; I love my grandkids.

KILMEADE: More than your--

WILLIAMS: And much more than any animal. Let me just tell you. But again--

WATTERS: Do you even have a pet, Juan?

WILLIAMS: Not at the moment.

KILMEADE: He's eliminated from the conversation.

COMPAGNO: Exactly.

WILLIAMS: But I just think it would be terrible to say, I love my pet more than my child.

KILMEADE: You don't tell the kid that. But you could tell the stranger on the phone.

COMPAGNO: OK, One More Thing is up next.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WILLIAMS: Welcome back. It's time now for One More Thing. I'm going to start. Jesse and I are going to see if we can get a good shoe on to see who can blow a big tank bubble.

WATTERS: I already did it, Juan. You got me beat.

WILLIAMS: As you can see from my shirt and tie, we're raising awareness today for breast cancer and an event called Race for The Cure. It's going to take place here in New York on Sunday. Our colleague Gerri Willis will lead the Fox team again this year. She was diagnosed with breast cancer, went through eight months grueling treatment, but today Gerri is cancer free.

About 100 people from Fox are going to participate, the company's matching all contributions from anyone to fight breast cancer and they're also paying for the runner's entrance fees. So, to support Gerri and her Fox team, please donate here. And good luck Gerri. Good luck to you and all the runners and supports a very good cause.

MCDOWELL: And go get your boobs checked, ladies.

WATTERS: That's right.

WILLIAMS: OK. You say that. Jesse, you're up.

WATTERS: All right. Well, good luck to the Washington Redskins this weekend because they play the Eagles. All right. So, what Juan and I are going to do--

WILLIAMS: Wait a minute, why are you rooting for the Redskin.

WATTERS: They're going to need it. Juan and I are going to do one of those bets like the mayors do when the Super Bowl happens, so if the Redskins win, I will buy Juan a cheese steak and then I will say something nice about Liz Warren. If the Eagles win, I get crab cakes and you have to say something nice about Donald Trump.

WILLIAMS: This is tough.

KILMEADE: It's never happened.

WILLIAMS: Wait, I think the Eagles are favorite. Do I get points?

WATTERS: You get no points. This is straight up. All right. Also--

KILMEADE: You know the press is going to clip it and retweet it.

WILLIAMS: Like Alabama, Alabama, Alabama.

WATTERS: OK, moving on. I'm on Tucker tonight defending my title for the news quiz and Watters World this weekend, we have Eric Trump and a big shootout with Anthony Scaramucci. You're going to want to tune in for that.

WILLIAMS: All right, let's pick up the pace.

KILMEADE: You and him?

WILLIAMS: Brian, we've got to go.

KILMEADE: All right. Let me see how much time do I have, I've got plenty of time. OK. I want you to meet Samuel Kemp and the best catch you've ever seen. He is on a roller coaster and he is up in the air and he catches an iPhone in the air. I thought this was fake. This guys from New Zealand. He's in Spain at a water park, at an amusement park. And he's on the Shambhala roller coaster at which time somebody loses an iPhone. He grabs it out of the sky. This guy is an elite athlete. Guess what sport he's great at? He's a fist baller. He's fists bowling. He's at the fist bowling World Championships and he made that catch and that was caught on tape.

WILLIAMS: Dagen.

KILMEADE: And that is the best thing you ever see.

WILLIAMS: Dagen, I need you to go.

WATTERS: Just want to keep up.

MCDOWELL: Collier County, Florida police officers show up for a call. Cat burglar somebody broke into a house causing reckless. It was a cat. He was microchip. His name was Bones. He was turned over to animal services to reunite him with his family and Juan, HTTR this weekend.

WILLIAMS: Yes, I'm all for it. You know what that means.

KILMEADE: No.

WILLIAMS: Hail to the Redskins. You're at it, Emily.

COMPAGNO: All right.

WATTERS: Juan said it. Juan said Redskins. Yes.

WILLIAMS: You got me. You know why, because Dagen's--

KILMEADE: Emily go.

WILLIAMS: Go, go.

COMPAGNO: OK. All right you guys this weekend was the NASCAR throwback race at Darlington, I had such a blast with the key parts number 32.

WILLIAMS: Look at you.

COMPAGNO: Team driver Corey LaJoie. They made me even - I was literally part of the pit crew. I had the outfit and everything practicing with lug nuts, pushing the car. It was incredible. I also got a moment with our Fox Friends, the Shriners Hospital team and the local firefighters and everything was a blast. Thank you so much.

WATTERS: Dagen likes that, you can change the tire.

COMPAGNO: It was awesome.

KILMEADE: Full cycle.

MCDOWELL: I can tighten or loosen your car just based on air pressure.

KILMEADE: Right.

MCDOWELL: Just so in case--

WILLIAMS: All right. Maybe you should marry her.

KILMEADE: Juan.

WILLIAMS: That's it for us. You know what, we're going to be back here on Monday. And we want to see you with us. Have a great weekend everyone.

KILMEADE: He won't be chewing gum.

Content and Programming Copyright 2019 Fox News Network, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Copyright 2019 CQ-Roll Call, Inc. All materials herein are protected by United States copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of CQ-Roll Call. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content.