Google makes $6 million grant to bring computer science education to underserved youth

Google is ramping up its computer science education efforts, announcing a $6 million grant to the National 4-H Council, a youth development organization.

The grant aims to bring computer science to underserved youth across the country, according to Google, which notes that the effort is particularly focused on rural communities.

Google’s funding will expand 4-H’s Computer Science Career Pathway to reach more than one million youth over the next three years, according to the tech giant. “The program will bring new computer science education programs to communities across Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon and Virginia,” it said, in a statement obtained by Fox News. The Google funding will also expand 4-H’s programming in California, Illinois, Indiana, New York and West Virginia.

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The Mountain View, Calif.-based firm has partnered with 4-H since 2017 and had invested $2 million to fund the organization’s efforts prior to the latest grant.

"We are excited to build on our work with 4-H with an additional $6 million grant to support computer science education in 4-H programs across the country,” said Google CEO Sundar Pichai, in a statement emailed to Fox News. “With this grant, we aim to help more young people develop their coding and leadership "skills that will put them on a path for future success.”

“While talent is everywhere, opportunity is not,” said Jennifer Sirangelo, president and CEO of the National 4-H Council, in a statement emailed to Fox News. “That’s why it’s so important to make sure young people everywhere have access to skill-building and mentorship opportunities that will inspire and empower them.”

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Employment in life, physical, and social science occupations is projected to grow 10 percent from 2016 to 2026, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. This is faster than the average for all occupations, and will result in about 124,800 new jobs, officials say.

“Increasing demand for expertise in the sciences, particularly in occupations involved in biomedical research, psychology, energy management, and environmental protection, is projected to result in employment growth,” explains the Bureau of Labor Statistics on its website.

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