Mysterious, century-old shipwreck unearthed on Jersey shore

A unique holiday mystery is unfolding on the storm-battered beaches of the New Jersey shore.

Over the weekend, a shift in sand levels unearthed the remnants of a 25-foot shipwreck dating to the 1800s at Stone Harbor beach, according to NJ.com.

The ship's origins are unclear, but some locals have reportedly speculated that the wreck may be the remains of a vessel that sank near the Hereford Inlet in 1800s.

According to Stan Sperlak, a board member at the Cape May County Museum, the area where the shipwreck was uncovered was dangerous for sailors.

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Sperlak believes the wreck belongs to the D.H. Ingraham, a schooner carrying a cargo of limes that was bound for Virginia and sunk in 1886, NJ.com reported.

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That vessel apparently sank about a mile and a half north of the Hereford Lighthouse.

A wide range of factors impacts whether a shipwreck's remains are found, including storms, wind speed and shifting sands.

Several photographs of the shipwreck have been circulating on social media, including the ones above from Werner Tedesco.

A shipwreck was uncovered in New Jersey over the holiday weekend.

A shipwreck was uncovered in New Jersey over the holiday weekend. (Stone Harbor Museum)

In 2014, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers discovered the remains of a 100-to-200-foot-long ship while making repairs to the Barnegat Inlet jetty after Hurricane Sandy.

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On the other side of the globe, a few months back researchers announced the stunning discovery of the "world's oldest intact shipwreck" at the bottom of the Black Sea. The remains of the ancient trading vessel were found 1.2 miles below the water's surface.

Fox News' James Rogers and The Associated Press contributed to this report.