Texas Rep. Dan Crenshaw says left obsessed with taxes; ‘benevolent bureaucrats’ responsible for wasteful spending

U.S. Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas, outlined his thoughts Tuesday on the philosophical differences between the left and right on the role of government, saying “benevolent' bureaucrats” have been responsible for wasteful spending.

"Why does the left hate the tax cuts?" Crenshaw asked in a Twitter post. "[Because] they think the people exist to fund the govt. We believe the govt exists to protect the inalienable rights of the people. When people keep their money, we get more jobs & wage growth, & less wasteful spending by 'benevolent' bureaucrats."

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The tweet was accompanied by a video of the freshman congressman talking to his colleagues about taxation and the role of government.

“It’s a question of whether the government should be taking more of your money of whether you should keep more of your money,” he said. “It’s the difference in the role of government, in what we believe. It seems to me that what you all believe is that the role of government is to tax the people as much as possible so you and your benevolent fellow academics can dream up more programs for the government to spend money on. I don’t believe that. I don’t believe that is what the role of government is for.”

Crenshaw, who serves on the Homeland Security and Budget committees, disputed the notion that anecdotes from the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act are imaginative.

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He then cited positive results in Texas that included increased education opportunities by $150 million at McDonald's, $500 employee bonuses at Camp Construction Services, reduced bills for customers at CenterPoint Energy, $500 employee bonuses at Group One Automotive, and $1,600 employee bonuses at Cabot Oil & Gas.

“It’s literally not imagination to bring up anecdotes. It’s literally not that. It’s reality,” he said.

The economy grew at a 3.1 percent rate from the fourth quarter of 2017 to the fourth quarter of 2018, one measure of annual growth, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis.