AOC says only a 'sea sponge' would believe her '12 years' doomsday remark, but most Dems bought it

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s claim that the world will “end in 12 years” unless climate change is tackled was accepted as a fact by two-thirds of Democrats, even though she said herself that only those with the “social intelligence of a sea sponge” could actually believe it.

The New York Democrat drew mockery from Republicans after she made the doomsday warning in a bid to convince people that radical action against climate change is needed.

OCASIO-CORTEZ CALLS CLIMATE CHANGE ‘OUR WORLD WAR II,’ WARNS THE WORLD WILL END IN 12 YEARS

“Millennials and people, you know, Gen Z and all these folks that will come after us are looking up and we’re like: ‘The world is gonna end in 12 years if we don’t address climate change and your biggest issue is how are we gonna pay for it?'” Ocasio-Cortez said. A few months later she repeated the claim again.

Earlier this month, however, Ocasio-Cortez backtracked on the gloomy forecast and instead blamed the Republican Party for taking her humor and sarcasm literally.

"This is a technique of the GOP, to take dry humor + sarcasm literally and 'fact check' it," she wrote.

But it appears that more than two-thirds of surveyed Democrats took her literally.

A Rasmussen poll, conducted earlier this week, found 67 percent of Democrats believing that the U.S. has only 12 years to avert the “disastrous and irreparable damage to the country and the world” stemming from climate change. Out of all total likely voters, 48 percent of respondents believed the apocalyptic claim.

OCASIO-CORTEZ SAYS GROWING CAULIFLOWER IN COMMUNITY GARDENS IS 'COLONIAL'

Ocasio-Cortez has emerged as the key Democratic voice on how to tackle climate change, proposing the Green New Deal resolution that seeks to radically reorganize the economy to ensure climate change is tackled.

The proposal was endorsed by a number of 2020 presidential candidates even before the disastrous rollout of the proposal, which included the now-infamous FAQ document that suggested making air travel obsolete and supporting those “unwilling to work.”

Senate Democrats in March failed to reach the 60 votes necessary to begin debate on the Green New Deal proposal, with 42 Democrats and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., voting “present.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The lawmakers said they didn’t vote for the proposal because it was brought to a vote by Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for political purposes.