Marianne Williamson says liberals are 'mean' and lie: 'I thought the right did that'

Longshot Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson suggested in a new interview that she was surprised to find liberals are "so mean" and even lie — lashing out at the party's treatment of her spiritually tinged campaign.

Williamson sat down with New Yorker editor David Remnick for a wide-ranging podcast conversation, in which she also denied being an anti-vaxxer. She was asked about her plan to take on President Trump with kindness and the politics of "love," as well as the reception her campaign has gotten.

“I know this sounds naïve,” Williamson said. “I didn’t think the left was so mean. I didn’t think the left lied like this. I thought the right did that, I thought we were better.”

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“I didn’t think the left was so mean. I didn’t think the left lied like this. I thought the right did that, I thought we were better.”

— Marianne Williamson

Williamson said “the haters in this country have been collectivized for political purpose” and added that liberal New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof would have been her ideal secretary of state before he condemned her candidacy.

“But then I read that he can’t stand me, so he probably wouldn’t want to work for me,” Williamson said.

Williamson also told The New Yorker that she is “not an anti-vaxxer” and admitted that vaccinations “save lives,” saying a “sloppy comment” resulted in her being labeled as an anti-vaxxer, which put a target on her for social media mockery.

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“I said that they were draconian. I said that they were Orwellian,” she said. “I would not say that [now]. It was a sloppy comment that a presidential candidate should not have said.”

At one point during the freewheeling interview, Williamson oddly said that Trump’s facial features have changed over the years but declined to elaborate.

“If you look at interviews with [Trump] from the 80s… he even looked different, which gives me my own theories about what’s involved in all this. When you see features on someone’s face change that much. I’ll leave it at that,” she said.

Remnick asked, “Not just aging?”

Williamson then told Remnick to “research” and he quickly asked what she meant.

“I don’t want to go into that. It’s just that there are a lot of people who find a lot very curious about the president,” Williamson said. “I’m not running on a campaign of personal demonization, personal attacks. I can keep it to conversations about the president’s policies.”

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The spiritual author-turned-presidential hopeful has called for a "Department of Peace" to spur peace initiatives domestically and abroad. Williamson also fought back when she was criticized this week after a reporter tweeted a screenshot of her appearing to attribute Hurricane Dorian's changed path to the "creative use of the power of the mind."

"Millions of us seeing Dorian turn away from land is not a wacky idea," she said in a now-deleted tweet. "It is a creative use of the power of the mind. Two minutes prayer, visualization, meditation for those in the way of the storm."

Reporter Yashar Ali tweeted that post and Williamson promptly accused him of trying to "debunk, counter or mischaracterize anything I do."

In another tweet, Williamson seemed to deny that she claimed that "power of the mind" affected Hurricane Dorian's path.

Fox News’ Louis Casiano and Sam Dorman contributed to this report.