Crenshaw says SEAL accused of war crimes should stand trial before potential pardon

Congressman Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas, this week said a Navy SEAL accused of war crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan should stand trial before President Trump considers him for a pardon, according to a report.

Trump is reportedly planning to pardon Special Warfare Operator Chief Edward Gallagher who stands accused of killing a wounded teenage ISIS fighter and another Afghani civilian in 2010, according to The New York Times.

Several of his former teammates plan to testify against him, The Navy Times reported. One is expected to testify that Gallagher admitted he “killed four women,” and two other petty officers told investigators he bragged about "killing 10-20 people a day,” according to The Navy Times.

TRUMP REPORTEDLY PREPARING TO PARDON SEVERAL US MILITARY MEMBERS ACCUSED OR CONVICTED OF WAR CRIMES

“These cases should be decided by the courts, where the entirety of the evidence can be viewed. Only after that should a pardon be considered,” Crenshaw told The National Review. He served in the SEALs for 10 years and lost his eye in Afghanistan to an IED.

Congressman Dan Crenshaw served as a Navy SEAL from 2006 to 2016. 

Congressman Dan Crenshaw served as a Navy SEAL from 2006 to 2016.  (Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images))

Indicted Congressman Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., supports the possible pardon. “I don’t trust the Navy to give him a fair trial, but I think with all of the focus on this case that he stands more of a chance of getting a fair trial now,” he told The Associated Press. Hunter served as a Marine in Iraq.

Gallagher is among several service members Trump is considering giving a pardon on Memorial Day. His trial is scheduled to start on May 28 – the day after Memorial Day.