Emma Thompson foresees people eating pets for 'protein' due to 'climate crisis'

Continue Reading Below

Fido and Sylvester could be in big trouble, according to Emma Thompson.

The actress issued a strong warning on Thursday of an impending "climate crisis" so dire that people will have no choice but to eat their own pets.

The actress, 60, attended an Extinction Rebellion protest outside of the BBC Broadcasting House in London on Thursday, where she claimed there is "extreme weather" ahead.

EMMA THOMPSON REPRISES 'MEN IN BLACK' ROLE FOR SPIN-OFF

This image released by Amazon Studios shows Emma Thompson in a scene from "Late Night."  (Emily Aragones/Amazon Studios via AP)

Continue Reading Below

Citing climate trends, the "Saving Mr. Banks" star warned citizens there will be an "increased chance of warmer, wetter winters and hotter, drier summers, along with an increase of frequency and intensity of extremes."

The activist read a script as she advised the public to prepare for what the "gloomy" future holds.

EMMA THOMPSON ASKED PRINCE WILLIAM IF SHE COULD KISS HIM DURING HER DAMEHOOD CEREMONY

Actress Emma Thompson, center, joins Extinction Rebellion demonstrators causing disruption at the major road junction Oxford Circus in central London, Friday, April 19, 2019. The pressure group Extinction Rebellion is calling for continuing civic disobedience to demand government action on climate change.  (Jonathan Brady/PA via AP)

"Better wrap up warm, stockpile food and remember there is a surprising amount of protein in the average household pet."

Also included in the British film star's grave warning was the possibility of flood warnings "almost everywhere," the Evening Standard reported.

"Expect crop failures, water contamination, damaged houses and ruined lives, and we will see these persistent weather fronts continue to wreak havoc across the nation, albeit with one or two days of dry and settled weather," she continued.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The "Nanny McPhee" star is well known for speaking out about environmental issues. But in April, she came under fire for flying thousands of miles to attend an event to protest climate change.

"I may well be hypocritical by flying but I'm conscious of flying so I fly much less, but sometimes I have to when I'm working. But I'll continue to find ways to get to places without flying," she said.