Beer

Bud Light to use new ad approach for Super Bowl

Fox Foodie: Does beer actually make people more attractive? Panel also weighs in on mashups going too far

 

Forget the famous faces, over-the-top epic promotions and controversial anti-craft beer opinions.

For the Super Bowl this year, Budweiser wants to remind viewers of a simpler time and bring people together.

On Wednesday, the company revealed that one of its 2017 Super Bowl spots will highlight the American Dream by featuring Adolphus Busch’s trip from Germany to the United States. The ad, which was filmed in New Orleans because the architecture conjured an 1800’s feel, will culminate with the creation of Budweiser beer in 1876.

And yes, those famous Clydesdale horses will make an appearance in the spot, according to The Wall Street Journal.

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But that's just one of Anheuser-Busch’s Super Bowl ads. The company has purchased three minutes of air time for four of its top-selling brands: Bud Light, Budweiser, Michelob Ultra and Busch.

Michelob Ultra’s 30-second spot, its first Super Bowl ad since 1955, will incorporate its fitness-centered campaign that encourages consumers to “go the extra mile.” It may reportedly feature the theme song from the TV show “Cheers,” although it hasn’t been finalized yet.

Bud Light, the top-selling beer brand in the U.S., will start a new campaign with a 60-second spot allegedly focused on Bud’s link in solidifying relationships.

The brewer says it's making a conscious effort to return to a basic marketing approach.

“Do not expect celebrities. Do not expect epic things,” Marcel Marcondes, vice president of marketing at Anheuser-Busch, said in a media briefing on Tuesday.

According to Variety, Marcondes believes that consumers prefer less gimmicks in lieu of “brands that stand for something strong.”

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This year also marks a significant departure from Budweiser's much-maligned 2015 ad that mocked craft beer drinkers and celebrated its status as a big company. The commercial sparked significant backlash among the small brewers' community and many called out the beer giant for being hypocritical as AB InBev continues to buy up smaller brands.