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California rejects VW's latest plan to fix illegal diesels

FILE - In this Sept. 30, 2015, file photo, John Swanton, spokesman with the California Air Resources Board, explains how a 2013 Volkswagen Passat with a diesel engine is evaluated at the emissions test lab in El Monte, Calif. California air quality regulators, on Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016, rejected Volkswagen's recall plan to fix vehicles including the Beetle and Jetta that were programmed to trick government emissions tests. (AP Photo/Nick Ut,File)

FILE - In this Sept. 30, 2015, file photo, John Swanton, spokesman with the California Air Resources Board, explains how a 2013 Volkswagen Passat with a diesel engine is evaluated at the emissions test lab in El Monte, Calif. California air quality regulators, on Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016, rejected Volkswagen's recall plan to fix vehicles including the Beetle and Jetta that were programmed to trick government emissions tests. (AP Photo/Nick Ut,File)

California regulators have rejected Volkswagen’s latest plan to fix the emissions systems on hundreds of thousands of diesel cars equipped with emissions test cheating software.

California Air Resources Board (CARB) Chair Mary D. Nichols said in a press release that "Volkswagen made a decision to cheat on emissions tests and then tried to cover it up. They continued and compounded the lie and when they were caught they tried to deny it.”

They need to make it right. Today's action is a step in the direction of assuring that will happen."

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) supports CARB’s move, and issued a statement that says “Volkswagen has not submitted an approvable recall plan to bring the vehicles into compliance and reduce pollution. EPA has conveyed this to the company previously.”

CARB sets its own emissions regulations, which are followed by 16 other states, but is working closely with the EPA on the Volkswagen issue.

Volkswagen says it continues to work with regulators.

The company's recall plan for 2.0-liter diesel engines covers 500,000 vehicles.

A recall plan for 85,000 3.0-liter engines is due next month.

Volkswagen told regulators last fall that it had installed software on its 2009 to 2015 diesel engine models to bypass government emissions tests.

The Associated Press contributed to this report