Suspects arrested in kidnapping of American tourist and guide in Uganda

Ugandan police have made arrests in connection with the kidnapping of American tourist Kim Endicott and her field guide, Jean-Paul Mirenge Ramezo, just two days after the duo were freed following five days in captivity.

An unknown number of people were apprehended in the Kanungu district, which neighbors the national park, as "raids and extensive searches" continue for more involved. In a tweet, the Uganda Police Force thanked the US Embassy and Tourism sector for their commitment to freeing the two and holding those responsible for the kidnapping responsible. Reports on how many suspects were in custody differ and authorities have yet to provide an official number.

Endicott and Mirenge were released Sunday after being kidnapped at gunpoint nearly a week earlier at the Queen Elizabeth National Park and held for a $500,000 ransom. On Monday, Endicott met with the U.S. Ambassador to Uganda in the country's capital of Kampala.

The arrests Tuesday come just hours after President Trump tweeted Monday to urge police to locate and arrest those responsible for the kidnapping.

“Uganda must find the kidnappers of the American Tourist and guide before people will feel safe in going there. Bring them to justice openly and quickly!”  Trump wrote.

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Endicott, an aesthetician in her 50s from Costa Mesa, Calif., came to Uganda to go on a safari because it was her life-long dream to see gorillas in the wild, her friend said. While out in the park with Remezo and two others, armed gunmen held up the van they were in, took the keys to the safari vehicle and left with Endicott and Remezo, leaving the two other tourists behind.,

Although it was first reported that no ransom was given in exchange for the safe return of Endicott and Ramezo, a Ugandan tour official said on the condition of anonymity that an amount of ransom was, in fact, paid for Endicott's freedom. Still, the ransom payment continues to be disputed by officials on the record.

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Remezo has not yet been reunited with his family, CBS News reported, and he did not travel to Kampala with Endicott on Monday.

Fox News' Katherine Lam contributed to the reporting of this story.