Winter storm sweeping across US, with more than 100M Americans in its path

A massive winter storm swept across the Midwest on Friday, bound for New England, where it was projected to dump as much as two feet of snow over the weekend. The National Weather Service said more than 116 million people live within its path.

Conditions "could approach blizzard criteria" in many areas, the weather service said, as it issued winter storm warnings from the Dakotas, across the Great Lakes states and into the upper Norttheast. Dangerous ice was also a possibility in some areas.

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More than 460 flights were canceled Saturday morning at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport in Chicago and about 50 flights were canceled at Chicago's Midway International Airport.

Amtrak canceled some Saturday trains scheduled to depart from Chicago to New York and Washington, and some Sunday trains scheduled to travel along the East Coast.

Chicago is forecast to receive as much as eight inches of snow Saturday, with wind gusts reaching as high as 35 mph. On Saturday morning, more than eight inches of snow fell in Libertyville, Ill.

The Kansas Department of Transportation announced one of their operators died Saturday morning in a crash in Johnson County.

"My heart is breaking for the family of this dedicated KDOT employee," Gov. Laura Kelly said in a statement. "Our KDOT personnel work very hard, at all hours, in dangerous conditions to make our roads safer for their fellow Kansas citizens. My thoughts are with his family, friends and the entire KDOT family at this devastating time."

On Saturday, heavy snow is expected to fall in parts of the Midwest. In New England, snow was expected to arrive later in the day on Saturday while eastern Oklahoma and northeast Texas will see light snow, according to The Weather Channel. The National Weather Service is forecasting the deepest snow for Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine.

Bikers crossing Park Street at the intersection of University Ave during a late afternoon snow storm Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 in Madison, Wis.

Bikers crossing Park Street at the intersection of University Ave during a late afternoon snow storm Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 in Madison, Wis. (AP)

In Pennsylvania, Gov. Tom Wolf declared a state of emergency Friday, releasing resources for combatting and recovering from the storm's effects, AccuWeather reported.

"We'll be aggressive in managing this storm," Wolf wrote in a Twitter message, "snowfall rates could exceed 1-2 inches per hour. Our top concern is the safety of residents. Postpone travel if you can, and be aware of changing conditions."

In New Jersey, Gov. Phil Murphy announced a state of emergency and travel restrictions that will take effect at noon Saturday. The snowstorm is expected to hit the Garden State and the rest of the New York City metro area on Saturday evening, New York City's FOX 5 reported.

The National Weather Service in Albany, N.Y., said snow could fall at a rate of one to three inches an hour into Sunday, creating "difficult to impossible travel conditions" in many areas.

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In Iowa, the Department of Transportation warned that visibility was less than a half-mile in many locations due to snow and wind. Snow was also starting to pile up in South Dakota, as authorities warned drivers to give plows extra room.

Meanwhile, in Nebraska, freezing drizzle fell Friday afternoon. A Southwest Airlines plane slid off an ice-slicked runway, prompting authorities to close Omaha's Eppley Airfield. No one was injured. Eppley suspended all flights for a few hours before reopening, but airport officials warned that most flights would continue to be delayed.

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On the West Coast, Pacific storms continued to batter California, which has seen heavy rain and snow this week.

Fox News' Kathleen Joyce and the Associated Press contributed to this report.