Security footage debated ahead of Maryland massacre trial: 'The defense calls it disturbing? This crime is disturbing!'

Pretrial hearings were held this week in the case of a man accused of gunning down five employees at a Maryland newspaper office last year.

Attorneys on both sides debated whether security video of the shooting would be allowed as evidence in the November trial, Baltimore's WBAL-TV reported.

Jarrod Ramos is charged with five counts of murder for entering the Capital Gazette in Annapolis with a pump-action shotgun and opening fire on June 28, 2018.

Jarrod Ramos is accused of killing five employees at a Maryland newspaper's headquarters last year.

Jarrod Ramos is accused of killing five employees at a Maryland newspaper's headquarters last year.

Killed in the shooting were Gerald Fischman, Rob Hiaasen, John McNamara, Rebecca Smith and Wendi Winters. Six other people were wounded.

DEFENSE SEEKS MORE DETAILS IN CAPITAL GAZETTE SHOOTING CASE

The video doesn’t show anyone getting shot, but it shows the suspect entering the building with a shotgun, flashes of shots and several victims trying to escape, The Patch reported. Ramos had reportedly blocked the exits.

"The video is basically the silent witness in this case," State's Attorney Anne Colt Leitess said. "(It's) very powerful evidence that shows the (Ramos') intent to kill."

The defense has argued the video would prejudice the jury against Ramos.

"It is very graphic. It is inherently upsetting and disturbing to watch. It is inflammatory," attorney Elizabeth Palan said,

The defense said it preferred to have five still frames of the video shown instead.

"The defense calls it disturbing? This crime is disturbing!" Leitess retorted.

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Ramos has pleaded not guilty and not criminally responsible, which is Maryland’s version of pleading insanity, according to The Patch.

The judge is likely to rule at Wednesday’s hearing on whether the video can be shown at the trial, WBAL reported.

Ramos' trial is set to start Nov. 4.