Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin's sentencing date pushed back to June 25

Prosecutors seeking longer sentence for Derek Chauvin than the 12 1/2 years that are recommended

The sentencing date for former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, who was recently found guilty of murder in George Floyd's death, was pushed back on Tuesday to June 25. 

Chauvin was found guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter last week after a three-week trial and 10 hours of jury deliberation. 

Minnesota law says that he will only be sentenced for the most serious count -- second-degree murder -- which carries a max prison sentence of 40 years. 

Derek Chauvin was found guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for the death of George Floyd.

Derek Chauvin was found guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for the death of George Floyd. (Minnesota Department of Corrections)

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Chauvin waived his right to have the jury determine his prison sentence, so Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill will determine it on June 25. The sentencing date was pushed back a week due to a scheduling conflict with the original date, June 16, a spokesperson for the Minnesota Judicial Branch told Fox News. 

Sentencing guidelines in Minnesota recommend 12 1/2 years for someone convicted of second-degree unintentional murder who has no criminal record. 

But prosecutors are pushing for Judge Cahill to go beyond that advisory range in what is known as an "upward sentencing departure." The state is citing several aggravating factors in pushing for a longer sentence, including that Chauvin was a police officer who "abused his position of authority," and that the murder was committed in front of a 9-year-old child. 

"We believe there are aggravating factors and the sentence should exceed the sentencing guidelines," Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison said after Chauvin was convicted. 

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Under Minnesota law, prisoners with good behavior become eligible for parole after they serve two-thirds of their sentence. So if Chauvin is sentenced to 15 years, then he would be eligible for release after 10 years. 

Chauvin is being held in Minnesota’s only maximum-security prison, Oak Park Heights, which is about 25 miles east of Minneapolis. He is currently being held in a single cell for his own safety. 

Fox News' Louis Casiano and the Associated Press contributed to this report.