Michigan doctor charged with fraud after allegedly touting vitamin C infusions as coronavirus treatment

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A Michigan doctor has been charged with fraud after allegedly submitting false claims to Medicare for vitamin C infusions that he touted as coronavirus treatment and prevention, prosecutors announced Tuesday.

Dr. Charles Mok, 56, is charged with health care fraud and conspiracy to commit health care fraud, according to a 47-page complaint.

The complaint says that Mok operated Allure Medical Spa primarily out of Shelby Township. Allure operates 26 outpatients in eight different states, with a least six clinics in Michigan.

According to the complaint, Mok defrauded Medicare before and during the coronavirus pandemic by submitting claims for injections that were either never rendered or unnecessary.

Many of the high-dose intravenous vitamin C infusions were given to patients at risk of contracting COVID-19 or those who had already contracted it, the complaint alleges.

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Mok claimed in multiple launch videos that vitamin C infusions supposedly reduce the severity of symptoms, duration of illness and increases the immunity system of those who have a high risk for contracting COVID-19.

The U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved no vaccines or drugs to treat COVID-19.

“Dr. Mok is charged with exploiting the current pandemic to defraud the Medicare program, and putting the safety and health of his patients at risk in doing so. These are serious allegations, and my office is committed to prosecuting any medical professional who attempts to use the Covid-19 crisis to defraud patients or insurers,” U.S. Attorney Matthew Schneider stated.

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Mok made his initial court appearance Tuesday afternoon. His attorney, Mark Kriger, could not be reached for comment.