Ex-CEO fears coronavirus infection, seeks to serve sentence in college admissions scandal at home

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A parent facing prison in the college admissions bribery scandal wants to start his sentence at home to avoid contracting coronavirus.

Douglas Hodge, who ran the PIMCO bond company, says that behind bars he would be at risk of catching the virus.

“The unprecedented and protracted health crisis posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, together with Mr. Hodge’s particular vulnerability due to his age, provide the requisite ‘extraordinary and compelling reasons’ to justify such an action,” his lawyers said in court papers.

Douglas Hodge, the former chief executive of the investment firm Pimco, leaves the federal courthouse after being sentenced in connection with a nationwide college admissions cheating scheme in Boston. (REUTERS/Katherine Taylor)

Douglas Hodge, the former chief executive of the investment firm Pimco, leaves the federal courthouse after being sentenced in connection with a nationwide college admissions cheating scheme in Boston. (REUTERS/Katherine Taylor)

Hodge is 62.

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His legal team said federal prison officials are already releasing people like Hodge who are older, vulnerable to the virus and pose no danger to the public.

Hodge paid bribes totaling $850,000 — from 2008 until 2012 — to get four of his children into the University of Southern California and Georgetown University as fake athletic recruits, prosecutors said.

HIGH PROFILE INMATES FROM MICHAEL AVENATTI TO TEKASHI 6IX9INE WHO HAVE BEEN RELEASED FROM PRISON EARLY BECAUSE OF CORONAVIRUS

Hodge, of Laguna Beach, California, is appealing his sentence, which is the harshest punishment handed out to parents charged in the case so far. Hodge is supposed to report to prison May 4. If the court won’t allow him to begin serving his sentence in home detention, he is asking to delay his report date until June 30.

Another parent, Hot Pockets heiress Michelle Janavs, is also asking for home confinement instead of prison time because of the pandemic.

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She was sentenced to five months behind bars for paying the consultant at the center of the scheme, Rick Singer, $100,000 to have a proctor correct her two daughters’ ACT exam answers.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.