Did 280-characters make Twitter more civil?

Even with Twitter's 280-character limit, brevity is still the soul of wit, but could that extra space be making the platform's 330 million monthly active users a bit more civil?

Back in November 2017, the San Francisco-based social network doubled its character count, prompting cries of joy from some and shrieks of outrage from others.

One year later, the company compiled data to assess the impact of 280 characters on user behavior and shared that information with Fox News.

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Twitter has seen a big jump in the use of "please" and "thank you," increasing 54 percent and 22 percent, respectively, in the last year.

The platform, which has taken flak for not cracking down on accounts spewing anti-Semitic or racist speech, has been trying to combat the spread of misinformation and abuse for years. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said recently that a range of radical changes, including the elimination of core features such as Follower Count and the Like button, are under consideration.

Twitter also saw a marked uptick in tweets with question marks, up by 30 percent, and said that overall tweets are receiving more replies. Also, the amount of abbreviated words like "gr8" and "b4" has dropped significantly.

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In addition, the platform's product team teased a few features that are available only to its employees as a kind of in-house test – including threaded, color-coded replies, a Twitter "status" setting feature and more – at the company's New York City headquarters last week.

Even with more space, however, only about 1 percent of tweets written in English hit the 280-character limit, and only 12 percent are longer than 140 characters.