San Francisco Giants deter invading seagulls with 'Cha Cha Slide'

The San Francisco Giants are plagued by seagulls.

Oracle Park – the team’s home stadium – sits on the edge of the San Francisco Bay, which would naturally make it a shared home with the birds. The birds often invade the field during the game, causing a big distraction.

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Austin Jackson #16 of the San Francisco Giants reacts as seagulls fly in the outfield during the twelfth inning against the Colorado Rockies at AT&T Park on May 17, 2018 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Jason O. Watson/Getty Images)

Austin Jackson #16 of the San Francisco Giants reacts as seagulls fly in the outfield during the twelfth inning against the Colorado Rockies at AT&T Park on May 17, 2018 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Jason O. Watson/Getty Images)

However, the Giants appear to have found a remedy to combat the seagull issue. It involves sliding to left, sliding to the right, freezing and then everybody clapping their hands.

The Giants appeared to have figured out that playing the “Cha Cha Slide” by Mr. C The Slide Man scares the birds away. A Giants official confirmed to SF Gate that the tunes are trouble for the flocks that invade the stadium.

“We use the audio prompts [to deter the seagulls],” Giants vice president of administration Alonso Felder told SF Gate. “These prompts, combined with crowd noise, can be effective in dispersing the seagulls in moments when they become highly visible.”

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A video posted by KNBR reporter Sam Hustis in March appeared to show the birds leaving the park as the Giants played the song. The clapping appeared to have spooked the birds.

Giants officials looked at a few options on how to deter the birds from the outfield, which were causing a distraction for players. Shooting them was one option that was disallowed, according to federal law.

“There are all kinds of approaches that people take, ranging from physical devices that involve light or sound, to more natural approaches that involve predatory birds,” Felder told SF Gate. “All of them have ups or downs, and I think we've been fairly careful about what advice we've taken. We want to make sure whatever we do is both safe from the perspective of people and birds, and also humane.”

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Felder and other officials determined noise was the best deterrent for the seagulls.