North Carolina Democrats: 'Thousands of outstanding votes to be cast' could swing races

North Carolina presidential race still too close to call

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An eyebrow-raising tweet from North Carolina Democrats claimed Monday that "thousands of outstanding votes to be cast" could swing key races in the battleground state.

North Carolina is one of at least 18 states allowing voters to "cure" ballots rejected for deficient information or missing signatures. Democrats in the state say they're seeking volunteers to help cure absentee and provisional ballots that they think could prove decisive in some races.  

"Our team is helping cure absentee & provisional ballots -- and we need your help. There are thousands of outstanding votes to be cast -- and these could be the difference in determining crucial elections," the North Carolina Democratic Party wrote in a tweet Monday. 

A spokesperson for the party didn't immediately return a request for comment on which races the party thinks could hinge on cured ballots. 

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North Carolina gives individual counties until Nov. 13 to report results, granting more time for counting provisional and absentee ballots than other states. 

Fox News has yet to call the North Carolina presidential race. President Donald Trump leads President-elect Joe Biden by a little over 1% in the state with 99% of votes counted. 

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Republican Sen. Thom Tillis leads his Democratic challenger Cal Cunningham by less than two points in the state's U.S. Senate race, which is also too close to call. A sex scandal hampered Cunningham's campaign in the race's closing stretch.  

Fox News has called all of the state's U.S. House races, with Republicans taking eight of the 13 seats. 

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Democrat Roy Cooper is projected to win reelection in the state's gubernatorial race, where he leads Republican challenger Dan Forest by more than 200,000 votes with 99% of votes counted.

Republican Mark Robinson, meanwhile, is projected to be North Carolina's lieutenant governor, which would make him the first Black man to hold that position.