How close to doomsday? Just ask former California Gov. Jerry Brown

Former California Gov. Jerry Brown on Thursday will give an update on how close the world is to doomsday.

Brown, a Democrat who recently completed his second two-term stint in the state's top job, is now executive chairman of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, according to the Sacramento Bee. The organization was formed by Manhattan Project scientists after nuclear proliferation.

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Though the group had primarily focused on tracking the threat of nuclear weapons, scientists recently have raised alarm over climate change. As governor, Brown signed several laws in hopes to reduce the risk of man-made climate change.

“We have a real challenge here threatening our whole way of life,” he said in November, according to the Bee. “We’re going to have to invest more and more in adaptation. It’s not millions. It’s billions and tens and probably hundreds of billions.”

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The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists in January 2018 moved the minute hand of the doomsday clock – which represents how close humanity is to catastrophe – to two minutes to midnight. It’s the closest the clock has been since the highest levels of the Cold War.

Brown, 80, first served as California's governor from 1975 to 1983. He later became mayor of Oakland and then California's state attorney general. Then Brown was elected to two more terms as governor, serving from 2011 until Jan. 7, when new Gov. Gavin Newsom was sworn in.

Brown is also the son of the late Pat Brown, who served as the state's governor from 1959 to 1967.