Tom Brokaw retires after 55 years at NBC News

Brokaw said he will step aside for a ‘new generation’ of journalists

NBC News veteran Tom Brokaw announced his retirement on Friday after spending 55 years at the Peacock Network.

"During one of the most complex and consequential eras in American history, a new generation of NBC News journalists, producers and technicians is providing America with timely, insightful and critically important information, 24/7. I could not be more proud of them," Brokaw said in a statement.

NBC News veteran Tom Brokaw announced his retirement on Friday after spending 55 years at the Peacock Network.

NBC News veteran Tom Brokaw announced his retirement on Friday after spending 55 years at the Peacock Network.

Brokaw, 80, spent his entire journalism career with NBC News. He covered everything from the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy to Ronald Reagan’s first run for public office and moved from Los Angeles to Washington D.C. in 1973 to serve as the network’s White House correspondent during the Watergate scandal.

He eventually left the White house to co-host "Today" before landing the anchor role at "NBC Nightly News" in 1983, a role he would keep for 22 years.

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Many prominent journalists took to Twitter to pay tribute to Brokaw upon hearing he would walk away from NBC News. MSNBC’s Steve Kornacki even unearthed video from his first day on the job at "NBC Nightly News."

Brokaw won a variety of awards over the span of his career, including the coveted Edward R. Murrow Award for Lifetime Achievement in Broadcasting.

In 2018, the Washington Post reported at the height of the #MeToo movement that former NBC correspondent and former Fox News anchor Linda Vester accused Brokaw of making "unwanted advances toward her on two occasions in the 1990s, including a forcible attempt to kiss her."

The report also detailed the claims of an anonymous woman who said Brokaw acted inappropriately toward her during her time as a production assistant in the 1990s. Variety later published similar claims, but Brokaw strongly denied any wrongdoing and over 100 current and former NBC female colleagues signed a letter supporting him. 

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According to NBC, "Brokaw will continue to be active in print journalism, authoring books and articles, and spend time with his wife, Meredith, three daughters and grandchildren."