See the map: Parents across the country are getting involved in their kids' education

From critical race theory to transgenderism, parents are speaking out about what is being taught in schools

Parents around the country got a front-row seat to their kids' educations during the COVID pandemic, when family dining room tables and living rooms became remote classrooms. 

Years later, most schools have returned to in-person learning, but many parents remain more heavily involved in the education process. 

Fox News Digital has spoken to parents around the country who are speaking before school boards and requesting to see curriculums, in some cases suing school districts or running for office themselves in an effort to strengthen their local education systems. 

NORTH DAKOTA PARENTS FURIOUS AFTER SCHOOL BOARD NIXES PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE: ‘BUNCH OF CRAP’

In Georgia, a school district came under fire from parents for removing a controversial syllabus from the website, which said Advanced Placement (AP) classes will teach critical race theory and Marxism. 

A father in California spoke out, claiming his third-grade daughter was taught about being transgender. 

In Colorado, a mom removed her daughter from public school after the student was invited to an art club, only later to discover it was a Gender and Sexuality Alliance. 

MOM SAYS PRESENTER AT DAUGHTER'S SUPPOSED ART CLUB ASKED OF SEXUAL ATTRACTION, SUGGESTED SHE WAS TRANSGENDER

ACTIVISTS, EXPERTS TRAIN AND ADVISE PARENTS ON ENGAGING WITH THEIR KIDS' EDUCATION

"When schools reopened last year for in-person education, we wondered whether parents would continue to stay engaged in education issues, or whether this movement would fizzle out," Nicole Neily, president and founder of Parents Defending Education, told Fox News Digital earlier this month. "We quickly learned that parents were even more worried than before, because they no longer had a window into their children's educations."

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Neily said parents' fears were well-founded, citing a video of a teacher in Utah questioning whether parents would take issue with her classroom, which is "built for non-White students."