Out-of-work Las Vegas showgirls take act online, showcase Sin City performers amid coronavirus pandemic

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What happens in Vegas apparently happens online now, too.

Two out-of-work Las Vegas showgirls are currently producing an online series to showcase at least some of the glitzy, glamorous acts Las Vegas is known for — albeit from the performers’ living rooms instead of theaters and nightclubs.

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“I was in a dance rehearsal … and everyone’s phones started blowing up with messages saying all the gigs had been canceled,” Devon Alarid, a Las Vegas showgirl who often performed at Harrah’s and Bally’s, remembered of the coronavirus health crisis’ effect on her industry.

Alarid said the bars and restaurants where many of the showgirls worked second jobs soon shuttered or reduced staffing as well, leaving most without jobs for the foreseeable future. But that didn’t mean they’d have to stop performing altogether.

A screenshot from "The Socially Distant Show" shows a dancer performing in front of the Bellagio Resort and Casino on the Las Vegas Strip.

A screenshot from "The Socially Distant Show" shows a dancer performing in front of the Bellagio Resort and Casino on the Las Vegas Strip. (The Socially Distant Show/SWNS)

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Teaming up with fellow showgirl Nina Kane, Alarid launched “The Socially Distant Show” on YouTube and Instagram, and invited Vegas performers to showcase their talents — dancing, singing, comedy — from a safe distance.

One show even featured a magician sawing his wife in half — in the middle of a deserted street.

In episode 5 of the show, magician Murray Sawchuck cuts his wife Dani Elizabeth in half.

In episode 5 of the show, magician Murray Sawchuck cuts his wife Dani Elizabeth in half. (The Socially Distant Show/SWNS)

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“You’re at home working/parenting/suffering. You need solid entertainment and a break,” reads a message Alarid and Kane posted to a GoFundMe page where users can donate money to the performers. “Our talented friends are unemployed. They long to perform.”

“We hope by doing this that we uplift some spirits, crack a few smiles, and ease some anxiety for those watching,” the message continued. “We think it will be a lot of fun and it will at least bring us some joy while we are all living our social distance lives.”

Alarid and Kane also hope “The Socially Distant Show” will encourage a few folks to heed the warnings of their local and federal governments by staying home.

“The more stuff we give people to do from home the more likely they are to stay home, and that’s really important right now,” said Kane.

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“The Socially Distant Show” is currently available to watch on YouTube and Instagram.