Instagram model takes to streets amid coronavirus outbreak, in skimpy outfit, to remind people to wash hands

From TikTok to Instagram, social media stars (and wannabes) are flooding the platform with creative ways to say what the surgeon general has been stressing to us all along during the coronavirus outbreak: Wash your hands, please.

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The model and host took to NYC's Time Square with her hygiene PSA.

The model and host took to NYC's Time Square with her hygiene PSA. (Samantha Gangewere)

The latest hygiene PSA comes from Instagram model Samantha Gangewere, who danced and posed in New York City’s Times Square while wearing a high-cut orange bodysuit with a plunging neckline and carrying a cardboard sign reading “Wash Your Damn Hands.”

In the steamy collection, the 28-year-old Pennsylvania resident is seen holding up her sign and dancing in the middle of the iconic NYC location while tourists pass by.

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“Just here to remind y’all to wash your damn hands!” Gangewere said of the stunt on her Instagram, where she posted the pictures and video for her 500,000-plus followers.

Those on social media were split by her stunt, with some praising the woman’s helpful reminder and others shaming her for what they deemed a publicity grab.

“Making traffic stop,” one person wrote.

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“You would take the opportunity to take a potentially worldwide issue and try to get some pr from it. And turn it into $,” a critic wrote.

“I’m obsessed with this,” another fan commented.

“Gotta love telling people things they should've learned when they were 2yrs old,” another wrote.

“Not original,” another person claimed.

“Clout chaser at its finest,” another shamed.

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Despite the reactions, Gangewere told Jam Press that her sign was really for her own benefit, as she suffers from a weakened immune system and wishes others would practice proper hygiene for their own safety — as well as hers.

“If someone coughs near me though, [they’re] getting my backhand if they don’t cover their mouth,” she said.