Connecticut sees 2nd EEE death just days after state announces first virus-linked fatality since 2013

A second person in Connecticut has died from the mosquito-borne Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) virus, state officials announced on Tuesday.

The death comes just days after the state announced the first death from the virus since 2013.

DEADLY MOSQUITO-BORNE EEE VIRUS OUTBREAK IN MASSACHUSETTS MAY BE CAUSED BY THIS, EPIDEMIOLOGIST SAYS

At a Tuesday news conference, Connecticut Lt. Gov. Susan Bysiewicz, along with other state officials, announced the second death.

“Today it has been confirmed that the second person who tested positive for Triple E has died. Both people were older adults one was from East Lyme and the other from Old Lyme,” she said. “This is a serious public health concern and we wanted to let you know that these are the first deaths from Triple E that have been reported here in our state [since] 2013.”

Earlier this week, local media reported a woman name Patricia Shaw died of EEE, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) describes as “one of a group of mosquito-transmitted viruses that can cause inflammation of the brain (encephalitis).” Her death connected to the virus marked the state’s first since 2013. She was 77.

“The identification of two Connecticut residents with EEE, one of whom had passed away, emphasizes the seriousness of this infection,” DPH Commissioner Renee Coleman Mitchell said in the news release following Shaw’s death. “Using insect repellent, covering bare skin and avoiding being outdoors from dusk to dawn are effective ways to help keep you from being bitten by mosquitoes. Mosquitoes continue to be active until the first heavy frost.”

RHODE ISLAND GIRL, 6, NEARLY DIES AFTER CONTRACTING RARE MOSQUITO-BORNE EEE VIRUS: 'WE COULD HAVE LOST HER'

Symptoms of the virus typically appear about four to 10 days after a bite, with severe cases progressing to encephalitis. Patients may experience high fever, stiff neck, severe headache and lack of energy. Approximately one-third of patients who contract EEE will die, and there is no specific treatment for the virus. Health officials said the only way to protect against the virus to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes.

In the neighboring state of Massachusetts, officials have tallied 10 human cases of EEE and three fatalities, while Rhode Island has reported three cases, and one death. On average, the CDC says five to 10 cases of EEE are reported each year in the U.S.

Fox News' Alexandria Hein contributed to this report.