Wisconsin pizza place selling toilet paper to help community struck by shortage: 'Only four per household'

Pizza and toilet paper sounds like a match made in heaven.

Stores around the country are reportedly selling out of toilet paper as people worried about quarantines due to the coronavirus outbreak attempt to stock up. One pizza place in Wisconsin saw the situation and decided to help out.

Zaronis in Oshkosh, Wisc., posted on its Facebook page that they not only had toilet paper, but were willing to sell it. Jon Doenel confirmed to Fox News that customers are able to order four rolls at the cost of $3.25.

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The pizza place announced the sale on Facebook, where the company posted, "Yep....ZaRonis has toilet paper. You can order it for delivery as well. You will find it online under 'sides of sauce.' Please, only 4 per household....because that's enough to get you through until the stores restock."

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Doenel said that when they started the sale on Friday, the very first customer that came in tried to order a case. "That's why we have to sell toilet paper to begin with," he said, referencing the recent news of customers stockpiling toilet paper, causing widespread shortages.

As the news of the pandemic continues to spread, more and more reports are appearing online of empty store shelves as customers stock up on supplies.

In regards to the price, Doenel isn't trying to get rich. At $3.25 for a four pack of Angel Soft, he's only slightly marked up the price in order to cover the extra work his employees have to do.

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He also confirmed that while some customers have tried to order extra rolls by creating multiple orders through the restaurant's website, most have been respectful.

Doenel explained that this is just one of several things that his restaurant is doing to help its community, including organizing an event to drive supplies to a local senior center and working out plans to keep kids fed if school's close.

"If you can't be part of your community, then you're in business for the wrong reasons," he said.