Sourdough bread-making increases in popularity amid quarantine, prompts criticism: 'Wasteful and difficult'

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Quarantine baking is the new social media trend, and people are rising to the challenge.

Apparently self-isolation and social distancing has turned everyone on social media into star bakers — and the most popular item to bake? Sourdough bread.

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Yeast and bread flour sales have increased 647 percent, according to Neilsen data from March, reports Business Insider. And much like toilet paper and sanitizing wipes, flour and yeast have also sold out at many stores around the country as the baking craze continues to take off.

But it wouldn’t be a true trend without some backlash.

People across all over the world are apparently getting into making their own sourdough starters for fresh baked quarantine bread.

People across all over the world are apparently getting into making their own sourdough starters for fresh baked quarantine bread. (iStock)

This week, the so-called “Sourdough Wars” kicked off on social media between bread makers and bread nay-sayers.

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A tweet by user HelloCVH seems to have initiated the whole debate, suggesting that baking's skyrocketing popularity came at a very inconvenient time.

“Sourdough is wasteful and difficult and it's very silly to try your hand at it for the first time in a pandemic when there's barely any flour on the shelves[.] This is my lukewarm & scoldy take,” the tweet read.

It seems the alleged “war” started because of the potential hoarding of baking supplies by those buying into the sourdough fad. Quickly, however, people responded – some defending their breads, and others agreeing with the Twitter user.

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Though those who enjoyed their kitchen time did not appreciate the woman’s remarks.

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Despite the half-baked controversy, which may continue to bubble up, it seems this quarantine pastime is here to stay — for now at yeast.