US military parades throughout history

The nation’s capital may host a military parade, if President Trump gets his way. 

“President Trump is incredibly supportive of America’s great service members who risk their lives every day to keep our country safe. He has asked the Department of Defense to explore a celebration at which all Americans can show their appreciation,” White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said Tuesday.

If such a event happens, it comes after a number of other U.S. military parades, including the ones below. 

Gulf War

A military parade most recently marched through Washington, D.C., at the conclusion of the Gulf War in 1991. The National Victory Celebration Parade, which went along Constitution Avenue, included tanks and Patriot missiles, C-SPAN reported.

“Great day,” then-President George H.W. Bush reportedly said of the event.

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World War II

There have also been parades related to World War II.

The 82nd Airborne Division took part in a Jan. 12, 1946, parade in New York City which also featured Sherman tanks, LIFE reported.

Before that event, an Oct. 5, 1945, parade in Washington, D.C., celebrated Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz of the U.S. Navy. 

“More than 1,000 Navy aircraft from fighters to dive and torpedo bombers, filled the skies above, thrilling the thousands of people who packed the National Mall and the parade route,” the U.S. Naval Institute said.

World War I

There have also been World War I celebrations: Gen. John J. Pershing of the American Expeditionary Forces led two military parades in September 1919.

One of those parades took place in New York City on Sept. 10. Footage of the second parade, which was held in D.C. on Sep. 17., can be seen below. 

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Civil War

The Grand Review of the Armies was held in Washington, D.C., in May 1865, in the wake of the Civil War and paid tribute to Union troops. It took place over two days. 

The Civil War Trust, a nonprofit organization, says that it "generated a near-carnival atmosphere that did much to diminish the pall that had settled on the city following the assassination of Abraham Lincoln." 

Then-President Andrew Johnson and others watched from a reviewing stand, it explained. 

Fox News’ Nicole Darrah contributed to this report.