Company plans 'the first luxury hotel in space' at a price of $9.5 million per visit

Do you have an adventurous spirit and some serious money to burn? A company called Orion Span wants to organize your next vacation — to outer space.

For just $9.5 million, Orion Span will take you on a 12-day journey 200 miles above the Earth's surface to Aurora Station, what it's calling "the first luxury hotel in space." The company expects to open the hotel in late 2021 and host its first guests in 2022. When operational, the hotel will host six people at a time, including two crew members.

"During their stay … travelers will enjoy the exhilaration of zero gravity and fly freely throughout Aurora Station, gaze at the northern and southern aurora through the many windows, soar over their hometowns, take part in research experiments such as growing food while in orbit (which they can take home with them as the ultimate souvenir), revel in a virtual reality experience on the holodeck, and stay in touch or live stream with their loved ones back home via high-speed wireless Internet access," Orion Span teased in a news release.

And what would a luxury hotel be without an insane view? Aurora Station promises "stunning" views of your home planet.

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"The hotel will orbit Earth every 90 minutes, meaning those aboard will see an average of 16 sunrises and sunsets every 24 hours," the company wrote.

Interested? Orion Span is accepting deposits for those wishing to book their stay. The "fully refundable deposit" will set you back $80,000.

Before embarking on your journey to space, you'll go through a three-month certification program. The first phase will be completed online, then you'll head to the company's Houston facility for in-person training.

While almost $10 million puts this experience well out of reach for most people, Orion Span says it's "a fraction of the cost" of other avenues to space.

Orion Span's ambitions don't end with operating a luxury hotel in space. "We will later sell dedicated modules as the world's first condominiums in space," CEO and Founder Frank Bunger said in a statement. "Future Aurora owners can live in, visit, or sublease their space condo."

Meanwhile, another company trying to make space tourism a thing, Virgin Galactic, recently completed the first "supersonic, rocket-powered flight" of its Unity spacecraft. According to CNBC, it was the company's first powered flight since 2014's fatal Spaceship Enterprise crash.

This article originally appeared on PCMag.com.