A new national poll shows Vice President Biden faring better than Hillary Clinton in match-ups against top Republican presidential candidates, as the VP weighs jumping into the race -- and meets Thursday with a top labor leader. 

Fox News has learned that Biden is meeting later in the day with AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka. This comes after he met last weekend with liberal icon, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren. 

He's making the rounds amid a flurry of polls showing Clinton potentially vulnerable. The latest Quinnipiac University National Poll shows Clinton polling better than Biden – who is not a declared candidate – in the Democratic primary race. But the poll gives Biden the slight edge when squared against leading GOP contenders.

"Note to Biden: They like you, they really like you, or they like you more than the others,” Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll, said in a statement.

The poll shows Biden leading Republican front-runner Donald Trump, 48-40 percent. He also leads former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, 45-39 percent.

More On This...

The former secretary of state also edges those candidates, but not by as much. She leads Trump 45-41 percent; she leads Bush 42-40 percent.

Both candidates narrowly lead Florida Sen. Marco Rubio. The survey comes on the heels of another showing Biden running strong in head-to-head match-ups against Republicans in key swing states. 

Biden continues to weigh a potential bid, as Clinton struggles with the controversy over her personal email and server, and faces eroding poll numbers. The Quinnipiac poll showed her with her worst favorability rating yet – with only 39 percent holding a favorable view of her, compared with 51 percent who don’t.

Clinton weighed in on the Biden rumors Wednesday, saying in Iowa that, “He should have the space and the opportunity to decide what he wants to do.”

“I’m going to be running for president regardless,” she added.

The Quinnipiac poll of 1,563 registered voters was conducted Aug. 20-25. It has a margin of error of 2.5 percentage points.