Critics blast ABC pundit for 'sexist' tweet aimed at Republican Rep. Elise Stefanik

This is a rush transcript from "The Five," November 14, 2019. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

JESSE WATTERS, HOST: Hello everybody. I'm Jesse Watters along with Katie Pavlich, Juan Williams, Dana Perino, and Greg Gutfeld. It's five o'clock in New York City. And this is “The Five.”

Democrats could be setting themselves up for a serious case of impeachment buyer's remorse. Remember, they promised us a bombshell testimony from their star witnesses yesterday, but Adam Schiff's spectacle failed to deliver. That dud could now prove to be a very costly mistake for Nancy Pelosi and her Democratic pals.

Of course, the liberal media is coming to the rescue. Check them out trying to reset the narrative by spinning what happened at the hearing.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: That phone call. This was a bombshell.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The big bombshell today.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: What did you make of the bombshell?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Going back to the bombshell, devastating testimony.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Devastating.

WOLF BLITZER, CNN HOST: Devastating new information.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Bribery.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Attempted bribery.

CHRIS CUOMO, CNN HOST: It was an attempted bribe.

JOHN DEAN, CNN CONTRIBUTOR: They already have more that t they had against Richard Nixon to impeach him.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WATTERS: And if you are wondering what the Democrats impeachment is really about, AOC just set it out loud. Listen.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

REP. ALEXANDRIA OCASIO-CORTEZ, D-N.Y.: At the end of the day, we have to be able to come together as the caucus. And if it is this Ukrainian allegation that what brings the caucus together, then I think we have to run with however we unify the House.

We also need to move quite quickly because we are talking about the potential compromise of the 2020 elections. And so, this is not just about something that has occurred. This is about preventing a potentially disastrous outcome from occurring next year.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WATTERS: She said it out loud, Dana. You're not supposed to say that.

DANA PERINO, HOST: Well, the thing is, I don't think the problem in the caucus is that they don't have an agreement on impeachment. They do have agreement on impeachment. The problem the Democrats have is that they don't agree on which way the country should go. Continue with free market capitalism or socialism.

They have the divide is not about not liking Donald Trump. They got a 99 percent agreement on not liking Donald Trump, so I don't think that the consensus that they needed was not necessarily about this, except I do think that Nancy Pelosi is probably going to have to look at them and say, I told you that this was not a good idea. You wanted us to do it.

And you know, I read a ton of news this morning, a run from the farthest left to the all the way into the middle to the middle to the farthest right. And my consensus this morning was that nobody woke up this morning thinking that impeachment is an imperative.

That day one did not change anybody's minds. And that they have this buyer's remorse thinking, OK. Now if the president were to lose next November, it won't be because of impeachment. It will because of lots of other facts and turn out and all of that. Now if he wins, and he --

WATTERS: Right.

PERINO: -- improves his total in the Electoral College or in the popular vote I do think that the Republicans and probably a lot of the Democrats will look back and say impeachment help him get there.

WATTERS: You know, I think he raised $3.1 million just yesterday on the first day of impeachment, Greg.

GREG GUTFELD, HOST: The Democrats there up ship creek without a paddle.

WATTERS: Good.

GUTFELD: Thank you. The media, I like the media, because they are complaining about not being take -- how this is not being taken seriously by the public. Like they expect more people to be enraged. They are acting like the film director after the movie bombs that first weekend and they read rotten tomatoes and it's just saying your movie sucks. And it is their movie.

The media helped direct this film. So, they are taking this rejection personally which is why you see CNN complaining about all the right-wingers who are telling viewers not to take this seriously.

But it wasn't a hearing. It was a say on. The entire process was based on the power to read minds. It's like they needed they thought they could see into Trump's brain, but you can't see his thoughts. You can see his actions, right?

So that's why everybody was like going, there's nothing here. The worst part about this whole thing, and it's kind of funny but sad, they sent therapy dogs to --

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: That was a coincidence.

GUTFELD: Was that a coincidence?

PERINO: Yes.

GUTFELD: Thank God.

PERINO: It's a good story, though.

GUTFELD: Well, tell me the story.

PERINO: There was --

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: There they are.

GUTFELD: This group was planning for months ahead of time. They were scheduled to be there on the Hill. They just happened to be there on the day of the impeachment. So, then some people thought that they were brought in for impeachment. It was just a coincidence.

GUTFELD: What I love about it because I'm going to pretend you never said that. Is that, these clowns manufactured the anxiety that they now pretend to suffer from. We are going to edit all of that out imposed.

WATTERS: We're not live right now?

GUTFELD: No. This is a free taste.

WATTERS: OK. This is on tape.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: Simulation --

GUTFELD: Yes.

WATTERS: To Greg's point about the audience now being blamed by the press for I guess not understanding the bombshell, they're not understanding the complexities of these high crimes and misdemeanors.

Juan, the Kavanaugh hearing, the Comey hearing, and even the Michael Cohen hearing had bigger ratings than this first impeachment hearing. What does that tell you?

JUAN WILLIAMS, HOST: What does that tell me?

WATTERS: Yes.

WILLIAMS: Well, I mean, first of all, Nancy Pelosi said I don't know why anyone would think that Nancy Pelosi has regrets. She said today she thought the witnesses corroborated a bribery case against the president of the United States. That's pretty significant to me.

But I noticed that when I'm listening to conservative Trump media, they say hey, you know what, Stephanie Graham, White House press secretary, this was a joke. Donald Trump, Jr., this is insanity. Some of the talk show host, don't watch it. A waste of time. This is stupid.

GUTFELD: That same it's me who said that.

WILLIAMS: Did you say that? OK, Greg said that too.

WATTERS: Greg said yesterday.

WILLIAMS: All right, all right.

PERINO: On the Fox had the number one, we had the most viewers.

WATTERS: Yes.

WILLIAMS: Yes. Thank you. That's because --

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: The show did very well. Thank you, Adam Schiff.

WILLIAMS: So, to my mind, it's like you know what, you get separate audiences in separate silos, right? And the message to the conservatives, don't worry. Don't pay attention. Don't listen, because it might change your mind and we don't want anybody to change their mind.

WATTERS: Well, Juan, Fox News was the largest audience.

WILLIAMS: I agree.

WATTERS: So how is --

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: But the message because the message --

WATTERS: -- how is the people -- how are people not paying attention?

WILLIAMS: -- not only here, but I'm talking about on a lot of the conservative talk shows and the like was this is to be ignored even though this is a historic event --

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: Not historic.

PERINO: OK.

WILLIAMS: It is historic.

WATTERS: Juan.

WILLIAMS: This is a remedy that the founding fathers put in place for when the executive, when the president is abusing his power. They're not -- right now --

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: That's not even the case.

WILLIAMS: -- remember, they're not building a final case. This is like, you know, this is not a criminal proceeding.

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: Yes.

WILLIAMS: But the analogy would be like a grand jury, they are looking for a preponderance of evidence and testimony.

KATIE PAVLICH, HOST: But they didn't get it today.

WILLIAMS: And you know what, public sentiment has shifted on impeachment, Jesse.

WATTERS: I know it has, Juan. I think it might be shifting away from --

WILLIAMS: And it's more in favor. Well, yes, but we know it's really high.

PAVLICH: If you look at the Republicans on the committee, they are not the one saying that you shouldn't be watching. In fact, they are saying we want to present even more people and different kinds of evidence to the American people. And Adam Schiff is refusing to do so.

The question I think for Schiff going forward is going to be what is his strategy? Is he going to continue down this road inevitably of wanting to bring articles of impeachment on the floor for a vote? Because at this point, you kind of has to. He's made all these claims about how serious this is, how it's a threat to the country.

Of course, that's what they would have to do to maintain his own credibility and his own ego, because he is leading the charge on this. Or, are they going to now shift the goal post and make different accusations? So, with Russia was there's all this collusion.

And then when they couldn't prove collusion they move to obstruction. Are they now going to move the argument down the down as they continue not to get the corroboration that they need to make the case?

WATTERS: And Dana, if this does go to the Senate, does that mean if there's a Senate trial that every senator must be there throughout the entire deal? Because a lot of the senators are going to be running for president.

PERINO: Yes. So, it's pretty interesting, actually. So pretty much, if you are a senator, you can choose not to go, but then you just increase the chances that the Republicans are able to acquit because of the votes.

But yes, think of Kamala Harris, Senator Booker --

WATTERS: Booker, Warren.

PERINO: -- Bernie Sanders.

WATTERS: Bernie.

PERINO: I can't remember there's others senators running. Apologies if I'm not remembering you.

WATTERS: Klobuchar.

PERINO: Thank you. Klobuchar from Minnesota. So, yes. So, it's about a six-hour ordeal every day six days a week, and you can imagine that Mitch McConnell would be like, I'll just sit here for two months. In January, in February. And you think that Iowa is in February, the first week of February, New Hampshire the second week. Super Tuesday right after that.

And also, if you are a juror as a senator, you are not allowed to talk about it. So, because --

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: Do you think they can keep this to themselves?

PERINO: Well, that's why I think that every -- I think that this is going to come to a pretty quick conclusion.

WATTERS: In the House.

PERINO: In the Senate.

WATTERS: In the Senate.

WILLIAMS: Yes, like a rush like, yes, let's get this over. But let me just say, Dana, to you --

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: Juan, you can do an impeachment by a whole --

PERINO: But how is it beneficial to Democrats?

WILLIAMS: No. I think they -- look, to Dana's point about, if Mitch McConnell scratches this out to embarrass the Democrats and prevent them from campaigning, don't forget Democrats think this is good.

PERINO: Yes.

GUTFELD: Yes.

PERINO: We'll have to see.

GUTFELD: It's the purest example of an orchestrated event meant to manipulate the public, right? Because now we're watching it and what did we see? Witnesses who didn't witness anything. We knew from the start this was a sham.

WATTERS: All right. I told you so. Impeachment hearings star Republican Congresswoman Elise Stefanik, hit with a very sexist smear by the liberal mainstream media. Details on that ahead.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

PERINO: Congresswoman Elise Stefanik coming under attack after mixing it up at the impeachment hearing. Watch.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

REP. ELISE STEFANIK, R-N.Y.: Will you be prohibiting witnesses from answering member's questions as you have in the closed-door deposition? Only one member in their staff --

REP. ADAM SCHIFF, D-CALIF.: The gentlewoman --

(CROSSTALK)

STEFANIK: -- on this committee has direct knowledge of the identity of the whistleblower.

SCHIFF: The gentlewoman will suspend.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

PERINO: ABC News chief political analyst Matthew Dowd going after Stefanik in a tweet, many are calling sexist. He wrote, quote, "Elise Stefanik is a perfect example of why just electing someone because they are a woman or a millennial doesn't necessarily get you the leaders we need."

Dowd later deleted that tweet and apologized. Stefanik accepted it, but also added that ABC, quote, "You should be ashamed of your comment. This is one of the reasons young women don't run for office."

Katie, let me go to you. You followed this issue; you know both of them.

PAVLICH: Yes.

PERINO: What do you think?

PAVLICH: He made it worse, because he deleted the tweet, she already issued an apology and then said we not only need to elect people not just because they are women or because they are millennials, but because they need integrity. So then, he implied that she had no integrity and that's why she was in office without any of that.

It's a gross tweet. You try to walk it back and then he was patronizing and saying, you know, I made a bad statement --

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: And they know each other actually.

PAVLICH: -- but I've done a lot for women. Right, and she worked for him in college to help write a book and this is the way that he has repaid her. So, if he didn't think that she was competent then --

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: Another example of Twitter not making anything better.

PAVLICH: Yes.

PERINO: The other thing that happened with her, Greg, last week is she is the youngest congresswoman I think, I guess maybe Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez could be different. I can't remember --

(CROSSTALK)

PAVLICH: She was first and then she --

PERINO: She was the first.

WATTERS: Republican.

PERINO: The youngest first Republican, anyway, she had a lot of firsts. But she didn't get on the cover of Glamour magazine and all the other things.

GUTFELD: Of course.

PERINO: So, apparently last week during the hearing or in the closed-door hearing.

GUTFELD: Yes.

PERINO: She goes to ask a question to a witness and the witness' lawyer said I'm sorry, I didn't think staff was allowed to ask questions. And she very graciously said, it's OK. It happens all the time. She is a young woman.

GUTFELD: She is young woman. I can see that, Dana. How condescending.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: What would like to say about her?

GUTFELD: I think what Dowd said was absolutely right. You shouldn't elect somebody because of what they are. It's who they are. Or is it the reverse. Now you know what I mean.

PERINO: What they think, but you should agree, Greg.

GUTFELD: But you don't elect somebody because they are black. You don't elect somebody because they are white. You don't elect somebody because they are woman. You don't elect somebody because they are a man. You elect somebody because they are persuasive, they've got talent.

Having said that though, I've changed my mind four times on the story. You could bet if she were on the other side, right? If she was going after, they would -- they would say she is a national contender for the presidency.

PERINO: Yes.

GUTFELD: So, we know that's what Dowd would say. But she's on the other side so he smears her. But then, he apologized. And you are supposed to accept every apology. I believe you should.

PERINO: Yes, I agree.

GUTFELD: You should accept every apology.

PERINO: And she did.

GUTFELD: Yes. But then he did that day --

(CROSSTALK)

PAVLICH: Then he made it worse.

GUTFELD: The he did, then he made it worse.

PAVLICH: Again.

GUTFELD: And it's like, OK, then not a real apology, and it goes back to, but then again, but it's only a tweet. So, I go back to your point earlier. Twitter makes everything and everybody worse. You are never a better version of yourself on Twitter. I know that personally. I am much worse on Twitter than I am here. If you can imagine how I am here, it's really bad.

PERINO: Jesse, do you think that you are worse on Twitter?

WATTERS: I don't do anything on Twitter.

GUTFELD: Yes, he don't --

WATTERS: I play it safe. Let's put it that way.

GUTFELD: So, that, ironically, that makes you a better person on Twitter?

WATTERS: That's sexism.

PAVLICH: It's a danger zone for Jesse.

WATTERS: You know, I think I have a very good ear for sexism.

PERINO: Yes?

WATTERS: Because a lot a lot of sexism is directed at me.

GUTFELD: It's directed at you?

WATTERS: Yes. My hair. You know, I pretend like it doesn't bother me, but it does. It does. I don't know. Does he have a crush on her?

PERINO: No, no, no, no.

WATTERS: Explain this away because I disagree with you, Greg. I think this is blunt sexism.

GUTFELD: OK.

WATTERS: I think she's actually a very confident, Harvard educated, aggressive defender of impeachment. She's on the intelligence committee.

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: No, no.

PAVLICH: Against impeachment.

WATTERS: Defender of -- yes, against impeachment.

PERINO: And she is very popular in her district.

WATTERS: She's very popular. She wasn't elected because she was a woman or because she was young. She is obviously very talented. And she didn't do anything in that hearing that Dowd was watching to invite any sort of ridicule.

GUTFELD: true.

PERINO: And if you remember, Juan, when she was first running, she was running against --

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: It convinced me.

WATTERS: Thank you.

PERINO: -- she was I think primary against two older Republican males who also did kind of the same thing.

PAVLICH: Yes.

PERINO: Like what would you go at the show. But she really worked and made her way. But she apparently rubbed Adam Schiff the wrong way when she was basically saying, aren't you going to allow us to have any of these witnesses and he thought it was inappropriate.

WILLIAMS: Well, I think a lot of people thought it was a concerted effort that started even before Congresswoman Stefanik spoke to try to disrupt the hearing and get Schiff off his game.

But you know, the idea, a woman and a millennial. To me, it could be good, it could be bad. And that's why the tweet was wrong. I mean, to me, the tweet is offensive. I'm sure I disagree with Ms. Stefanik on lots of things, but not on this one. I think that you know, you got to remember too that Matt Dowd is a Republican. So, I mean, this is not --

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: Independent.

WILLIAMS: No, no.

WATTERS: He change his party.

WILLIAMS: His history is as a Republican. He was -- he was a presidential advisor. So, to me --

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: We don't want him.

WILLIAMS: To me, this is, but to get back to this point about Twitter. You know. So, the other day, there was a situation where somebody said, OK boomer. And then an AARP official came back and said, yes, but us, we boomers, we have all the money. And then that set off a huge brawl --

WATTERS: Roasted.

WILLIAMS: Yes, exactly. And I thought to myself, this gets us nowhere. It's like, is this entertainment for some people? But she should, anyway, you shouldn't have insulted the congresswoman.

WATTERS: Also, to make another point, ABC, I mean, that's his boss. He should stop criticizing this congresswoman. They've been criticized, ABC, because they've been covering up a lot of nasty stuff over there.

PAVLICH: And Adam Schiff especially doesn't like Elise Stefanik because she was the first person to point that there may have been some communication between the chairman and the whistleblower.

PERINO: Yes.

PAVLICH: She noted the date of the letter, and the complaint, and has been calling him out.

PERINO: Super smart.

PAVLICH: Since they got the complaint about why he held it from the rest of the committee and wants more transparency about who they can and cannot talk to.

GUTFELD: Now I've changed my mind again, Dana. He, Dowd should be fired. He should be fired.

WATTERS: You're so open-minded, Greg.

GUTFELD: No. Well, it's five times now I've changed my mind today.

PERINO: Well, we'll give it --

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: You should run for office.

PERINO: -- we'll go to commercial break and see how you feel after that.

Coming up, campaign trail chaos as yet another Democrat jumps in. Plus, Hillary Clinton claims she is being pressured to run.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WILLIAMS: Sweet. The 2020 Democratic field being shaken up yet again. Former Massachusetts Governor, Deval Patrick, now officially in the race today. Meanwhile, Hillary Clinton is claiming she's being pressured to run in 2020.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

HILLARY CLINTON, FORMER UNITED STATES SECRETARY OF STATE: I, as I say, never, never, never say never. And I will certainly tell you, I'm under enormous pressure from many, many, many people to think about it, but as of this moment, sitting here in this studio talking to you, that is absolutely not in my plans.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WILLIAMS: Well, Katie, I don't think she is running, but you never know. I don't know what that was about, but I do -- I'm interested in asking what do you make of Deval Patrick?

PAVLICH: Well, first, I want to say Hillary Clinton's, everyone is asking you to run, I think it reminds me when Joe Biden said that he told Obama not to endorse him. Everyone is like, yes, Joe. Sure.

But Deval Patrick, look, you know, there's always more room in the stage at this point. His time to file. He's an interesting candidate. His background is different than other people on the stage. He's a capitalist. He is a minority.

He allegedly and reportedly has the blessing of Barack Obama, which will help him only I think behind the scenes with some fund-raising numbers, but also going into the primary process and if he wins the general -- or the primary.

So, look, I read the comments on the Twitter announcement that he made through the video and they were not good. People were really mad about it's too late. Everyone else has done all of the work. There is not enough room for you. Get out. You are an evil hedge fund guy, financial guy.

But I think, you know, he has good proximity with New Hampshire. He has a lot of work to make up in terms of going to Iowa, as Andrew Yang was saying, knocking on doors, getting people to vote for him. But maybe he's not banking on Iowa just like Joe Biden.

WILLIAMS: Dana, you know what strikes me is, Michael Bloomberg, who's also it looks like he's going to get into the race now. So, you have Bloomberg and Deval Patrick it seems to me both taking aim at Joe Biden, with the assumption being that if Biden collapses, they would win Biden voters, kind of sent Democrats. But Biden is not collapsing.

PERINO: No, and I think that you'll see some more of that coming out in the polls next week or so. Elizabeth -- I actually think that he's going after Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, that Bloomberg is. Maybe they think Biden won't be able to go the distance or that he's already been so damage by these allegations about bribery and Burisma and Hunter Biden. That they think he won't be able to do it. Plus, he can't raise that much money.

Bloomberg, I think, is a much harder sell than somebody like Deval Patrick.

PAVLICH: Yes.

PERINO: I think that he has a much greater chance of being able to deliver an Obama-esque-type message. I think he would give Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren a run for their money in New Hampshire. Might not be able to beat Buttigieg in Iowa who is doing very well. But I think that this race actually for all the -- I really believe it would be narrowed down by now, but it's actually growing. And I think there's probably room for it to grow.

WILLIAMS: Huh. She wants more people on the stage, Jesse.

WATTERS: Yes, it's a weak field. It's wide open. There could be a catastrophe next summer and here's how. If you right now see Joe Biden collapse and not win Iowa and New Hampshire, right?

And then, you have Bernie and Warren split the socialism vote and all the donors don't really open the wallet, Pete doesn't have enough juice to run up through the middle, you could have after super Tuesday and then no one else getting in going into the convention. No one hits that delegate ceiling. And you could have a huge bloodbath at the convention.

PAVLICH: Think of the past.

WATTERS: And we are going to have the best time covering it here on the Five.

PERINO: Yes.

WILLIAMS: Yes. Maybe the Democrat will nominate Trump. Hey, but, Jesse.

WATTERS: Yes.

WILLIAMS: Just to pick up on this point, you know, I like Deval Patrick. I personally know Deval Patrick, but what do they say, you are no Obama. I mean, Obama's charisma.

WATTERS: Yes. There will never be another Obama.

WILLIAMS: OK. Because when I hear people say that he could like, you know what, I think of Obama at what year was the convention in Boston --

(CROSSTALK)

PAVLICH: O-four.

WILLIAMS: O-four. That John Kerry -- that's a famous speech. I don't know if Deval Patrick can deliver that speech.

PERINO: But didn't some of the lines from Obama's speeches come from Deval Patrick?

WILLIAMS: He wasn't --

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: Don't you remember all that?

WILLIAMS: Yes, it's delivered. All right. So, Greg, I was just coming to you on this. You know, to me, if you don't know what Deval Patrick is doing --

GUTFELD: Yes.

WILLIAMS: -- it looks like well, he's a great guy. People like him. He was a governor. But he's just tilting at wind mills. Why now?

GUTFELD: I think he's actually probably one of the strongest people out there if he gets Obama's endorsement.

PERINO: Yes.

GUTFELD: That's going to be great. But all this people joining reflects the Democrat dysfunction, right? I call it electile dysfunction. Electile dysfunction because I wrote down that.

PERINO: You're on a roll today.

GUTFELD: This is a party without a plan, right? OK. It's like a bus on a road trip, no map, no GPS, but they got 20, 25 backseat drivers. They all left to D.C. to Seattle, but they're now in Anchorage, Alaska and they're trying to change a flat with a banana.

I mean, they are in trouble. So that's why this is happening, because all the smart people are going, Bloomberg is going, what? Bloomberg look at this.

WATTERS: He's like, you don't take a bus. You fly.

GUTFELD: You fly. And Deval is like -- Deval is a strong candidate. He should have entered -- he should have entered earlier.

WATTERS: Yes.

PAVLICH: You know it's bad when Hillary is like, everyone is telling me.

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: By the way --

PERINO: I wonder if she names one person.

GUTFELD: No, we're saying that, there's -- that's what you say when you try to exist the conversation. It's like saying sorry for your loss at a funeral. They come up to her, they go, here she is, you should run again.

WILLIAMS: Well, know what, we have time. Here's Hillary saying what it would have been like if she was president.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

CLINTON: Look, I think all the time about what kind of President I would have been and what I would have done differently and what I think it would have meant to our country and the world. So, of course I think about it, I think about it all the time.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUTFELD: I'm tired of being her shrink, Juan.

WILLIAMS: I was just saying.

GUTFELD: She is using America as her therapist.

WILLIAMS: You were prophetic, I'm telling you. So, what do you think Dana?

PERINO: I just - she can do whatever she wants. I hope people like - I think that when you lose. If you run for president, you never give up the dream. Do you think Al Gore thinks that he would have been a better President than George W. Bush? Of course, he does. You think John Kerry thinks he would have been better, yes. Did McCain think he would have been better than Obama, yes.

You could go on - everybody who lost thinks they would have been a better President than the person who won. The difference between wallowing in your loss and accepting your loss and moving on to have a really great life. It's not hard to do. You can accept it and move on or you can continue this charade.

GUTFELD: She just doesn't want to spend time with Bill.

WILLIAMS: Let's be fair though I mean obviously John McCain lost and went back to the Senate.

PERINO: I'm saying--

WILLIAMS: Al Gore is running a whole--

PERINO: What I'm saying, they all made a different choice. They accepted the loss. They were gracious about it.

WILLIAMS: I think they were critical at times.

PERINO: Well, very rarely. And they went on to do other things.

PAVLICH: Hillary Clinton will never be a Margaret Thatcher.

WILLIAMS: There we go. We can agree on that, Katie.

PAVLICH: Yes.

WILLIAMS: All right. Disney's new streaming service facing harsh criticism for slapping a warning on some of its classic animated movies. That's next. A hot one next on The Five.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

PAVLICH: PC police alert watching classic kids' movies like this could be offensive.

(VIDEO PLAYING)

PAVLICH: That's right. New streaming service Disney Plus slapping a warning on classic animated flicks like Dumbo and Lady and The Tramp. It's cautioning fans that there could be a quote outdated cultural depiction that may be triggering. So, Greg, our local cultural expert.

GUTFELD: I am. That's true.

PAVLICH: What are your thoughts on this?

GUTFELD: Well, this is another example, what we're seeing constantly is an out of proportion response to the activism of today. Nobody wants to be the object of a mob on Twitter. So, they try to preempt it by changing things and putting out content warnings. I love the good old days with the old content warnings. You know kids these days, Dana, they don't have - kids today don't have the giddy thrill of sneaking into an R rated film and knowing that's a possibility you might see partial nudity.

My sister Jeannie took me to see Animal House. Was it 1979, 1978? I wasn't - I was 14. I wasn't allowed to see that, and I saw stuff that I could not unseen. Thank you, Jeannie.

PAVLICH: So, Jesse.

GUTFELD: No one does that anymore.

WATTERS: The good old days.

PAVLICH: No rules. So, Jesse, Lady and The Tramp is allegedly offensive because the song, we are Siamese is performed by two cats speaking in a stereotypical Asian accent. They have examples for all of the other films that we named. Should they be--

WATTERS: Well. Yes.

PAVLICH: Should they just not show these films at all if they're going to be--

WATTERS: This is backlash by the Left by just putting a disclaimer and I think a disclaimer is fine. I'm OK with the disclaimer, don't butcher the whole movie. But I agree, there are obviously like from the 50s and the 60s and the 70s where they depict foreigners or other ethnic groups or racial groups in a demeaning or a dopey way.

PAVLICH: OK.

WATTERS: And we understand that that's wrong and that's hurtful, OK. But you can also as a cartoon depict other groups in a humorous harmless way as well by just you know portraying certain characteristics of certain groups that are common understanding among all people. And you don't do it in a nasty way.

GUTFELD: Are you talking about the Jews.

PAVLICH: But if you didn't create the film, you're growing up in the year 2019 and you're a 5-year-old kid, would you know that these things were stereotypical, or would you just be watching the film. Like would they know if it wasn't being pointed out to them that it was a racist, sexist, stereotypical portrayal.

WILLIAMS: Kids don't know this; they just accept it for what it is.

PAVLICH: OK, so is pointing it out to the kids necessary?

WILLIAMS: Well, yes. I mean look, two points to make here. When people change, cultures change, all the time and so if you're watching Amos and Andy today somebody should say to you that's not truly representative of the reality of way black people act. If you're watching Bugs Bunny today like Patrick my son told me on Bugs Bunny now and some of the streaming service, they have a warning because like if you watch Bugs Bunny is going off to war with Elmer Flood or wherever, they have really nasty depictions of Japanese.

I mean it's just unbelievable. Of course, if you look at like Westerns you know you look at some of our westerns, American, Native Americans, they're savages, there to be slaughtered.

So, I think cultures change and we have different views. It's not - I agree with you, Jesse, you shouldn't destroy the film, but it's nothing wrong with saying, hey kids, that's not true. That's not right. That was a caricature.

PAVLICH: Right. But that's my point. Unless you pointed out and say that this was, I don't know that kids would necessarily know that that's what it meant.

PERINO: I watched Dumbo a lot.

GUTFELD: What is it in Dumbo, by the way?

WATTERS: What is offensive about Dumbo?

PAVLICH: Dumbo is that the crackling crows speaking in a stereotypical African American way.

PERINO: Dumbo had big ears or something like that. But I'm going to have to take this piece of paper home for Peter because he - I told him about this segment, he's like what in the world, what happened, it's like from the Greatest Generation to the snowflake generation. I'm OK with the disclaimer. That's fine, but I don't like that this is also happening with school districts banning books. And books that were very thought - well maybe they were insensitive in some case at the time, but you can - everybody can learn, just don't erase our history.

PAVLICH: Yes.

PERINO: Learn from it.

WILLIAMS: But like with you know - was it the Prime Minister of Canada or the Governor of Virginia, blackface was once accepted especially for young white men--

GUTFELD: Apparently, it's still is.

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: Prime Minister.

WILLIAMS: I better stay out of your neighborhood.

GUTFELD: If he was a conservative, he would have lost his job.

WATTERS: The disclaimer.

WILLIAMS: Disclaimer.

PAVLICH: Governor Northam, we don't know if he was in blackface or the KKK.

WATTERS: Right.

WILLIAMS: Right. What a choice. But the point is that young white guys thought, yes, there is nothing wrong with this.

GUTFELD: And Joy Behar felt the same way apparently.

PAVLICH: Yes. And she's still working too. All right. Up next, Greg has the Fastest 7.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GUTFELD: Welcome back. Time for the Fastest 7. First up, we're going to throw to this video of a fish with a human face. Take a look.

(VIDEO PLAYING)

GUTFELD: Yes, so it looks like this thing is real. Most likely, a type of carp. Katie, I don't know about this, but this is why we don't eat fish, because it's almost cannibalism now, it's cannibalism.

PAVLICH: Almost.

GUTFELD: Could you eat that?

PAVLICH: I could have if I did not see what it looked like beforehand. And this is why you don't name your food.

GUTFELD: It looks - you know Juan, it looks a little bit like Brian Stelter.

WILLIAMS: You are so mean. Well anyway, I eat fish, but that's a carp.

GUTFELD: Is this real. I mean I'm assuming this is real.

WATTERS: This is a deep fake.

GUTFELD: It could be a deep fake.

PERINO: I think it's deep fake.

WATTERS: Did we just get deep faked?

GUTFELD: They say it's real. The producer is telling me, it's real. Unless you're throwing me under the bus. I'm not going to carp about it. Just shoot me.

WATTERS: Do you order the Branzino when you go to the restroom.

GUTFELD: My wife does.

WATTERS: The whole fish.

GUTFELD: My wife orders the Branzino just to piss me off, because the head - she has the head facing me while she's eating it.

WATTERS: Yes, I don't like that.

GUTFELD: It's disgusting.

PERINO: I think that PETA grew this in a lab and put it in the lake so that we would all stop eating fish.

WILLIAMS: Wait a second.

GUTFELD: That's the best.

WILLIAMS: No, no. Because if that was the case, they'd do it out of cow.

GUTFELD: Yes.

PAVLICH: They might, that'll be next week's Fastest 7.

GUTFELD: The chicken with a human face. How about a human with a chicken face? Next, we're going to have a human with a fish face. They're everywhere. All right. Up next, this is great. An airline passenger snapping this picture of someone putting their dirty feet near her head. Jesse, death penalty?

WATTERS: No. You know what that calls for, a quick recline as far as you can, snap those legs right back.

PERINO: No, I actually think that what she should have done is then held her phone up taking a picture of his face as well and then posted them side-by-side on her Instagram story.

WATTERS: Those are a woman's feet.

PERINO: Whoever it was, I just want the face--

PAVLICH: How would you know?

WATTERS: I think those are women's feet.

PERINO: I want the face that goes with the feet.

WATTERS: OK.

GUTFELD: I have very delicate feet, Jesse. So, those could be my feet.

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: Katie.

PAVLICH: This is disgusting. And she should shame this person. And there is personal space issues on planes already to make it worse.

GUTFELD: Yes. Juan, what's going on with the people's behavior. Are we suspending just decency when we're 35,000 feet in the air, it's like the other rules don't matter?

PERINO: It's not her bedroom.

GUTFELD: Or isn't it abdication, is that the word? A parental responsibility, people aren't teaching their kids.

WILLIAMS: This is such obnoxious behavior. I don't even know where to start. But I must say I've never seen this. Never seen it. I travel a lot, but I've never seen that. I would be appalled, but I must say the people when you're sitting next to them, sometimes will take off their shoes, sometimes they will like to fall asleep and snore loudly. I just--

GUTFELD: I hate that.

WILLIAMS: That's beyond me.

GUTFELD: I hate it when they fall into your shoulder and they start snuggling you and then they--

WATTERS: But you can't move--

GUTFELD: And you can't move.

WATTERS: You don't want to disturb their sleep.

GUTFELD: Get them off of you.

PAVLICH: I'll be like dude, get away from me.

GUTFELD: All right, last one. The National Toy Hall of Fame is out with some new inductees including Matchbox cars. I love those. Coloring books. That's not a toy. And collectible card game called The Magic, The Gathering which I believe Dana was your nickname in high school. Magic, The Gathering.

PERINO: You are right. I wonder which one of these cars are going to drive home tonight.

GUTFELD: That was very mean.

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: Juan, we're probably closest in age here, right. I was a matchbox guy. This is amazing.

WILLIAMS: Absolutely.

PAVLICH: Dana here's a jeep for you.

GUTFELD: It's Carmen Gia (ph).

PAVLICH: Mini Cooper.

WILLIAMS: A mini cooper. Yes. You take that home to Peter.

PERINO: He would love it actually.

PAVLICH: Here's a Jeep truck for me.

PERINO: I like the crayons. I mean I'm for that.

WILLIAMS: So, I've got to tell you guys. Not only am I a childish person according to President Trump.

GUTFELD: Yes.

WILLIAMS: But the child in me collects them. So, you know what, because I grew up in New York City, right. I put - but not these. I grew up in New York City. So, I have like a New York City Fire Engine, New York City taxi, New York City police car on my desk and their matchbox, and some of them like I'm sure you would appreciate this one, comes from the beach which I'm not from but it has a surfboard like an old Woody with a surfboard on the top. I think that's cool.

GUTFELD: Any toy. What was your favorite toy, Dana?

PERINO: I had a Sesame Street like house. Like one of their town. Like the brownstone and then you can open it up and then you could have all - like the doll house. From Sesame Street. Also, I had--

GUTFELD: The sad doll house.

PERINO: Had that farm. What was that thing, that was the barn like the farm animals, and you could open it up and I went moo?

GUTFELD: I had Lincoln Logs. Did you have Lincoln Logs.

WATTERS: Lincoln logs, yes.

GUTFELD: That was amazing.

WATTERS: Lincoln Logs.

WILLIAMS: But Dana, I think you'd grew up on a farm.

PERINO: Well, yes, when we were in college.

GUTFELD: What was yours, Jesse?

WATTERS: Toys?

GUTFELD: Favorite toys, what was your favorite toy?

PERINO: The one your mom threw out.

WATTERS: Oh yes, my mom threw out all my garbage pill kids. That's not a toy though.

GUTFELD: It can qualify.

WATTERS: Yes. No, those worth a lot of money now.

GUTFELD: Yes.

WATTERS: And then the Star Wars stuff. Or the Transformer. Things like that. I played with Hira or Shira. He-Man.

GUTFELD: He transitioned. Katie.

WATTERS: She-Man.

PAVLICH: My favorite - well it's hard to choose one. I had a lot of cars which I stole from my brother, but I had all five Spice Girl Barbies and their accessories.

GUTFELD: Oh! Me too.

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: You remember that one.

GUTFELD: Yes. Well, you can't--

WATTERS: You can't have that--

GUTFELD: Car anymore. So, you'd have to apologize for that right now, Jesse.

PERINO: They have a disclaimer on the car.

WATTERS: I'm sorry. A disclaimer on the car.

GUTFELD: What about Juan? What was your favorite toy?

WILLIAMS: Favorite. I don't know. A ball, some kind of ball.

GUTFELD: Some kind of ball.

WILLIAMS: I don't know. But I must say that it's a hazard car created a big fuss in my family because of the Confederate Flag.

WATTERS: Did you have one?

WILLIAMS: No, I didn't have, my kids and is like, I don't know about - this is close to what you were saying, they don't know.

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: What this means?

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: Dana just said she loved Simon Says, but I was against that because women don't need men to tell them what to say. Simon Says is sexist and I can't believe you still adhere to those old patriarchal roles.

PERINO: Go home and play tonight.

GUTFELD: Yes. All right. Simon Says, One More thing is up next.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WATTERS: Time now for One More Thing, Greg.

GUTFELD: All right. Let's throw up the dates for the Gutfeld monologues. We've got four coming up this weekend in Jacksonville, Florida. Durham, North Carolina that's Saturday-Sunday. Then in December you've got Cleveland, Ohio; Knoxville, Tennessee. Special guest Tom Shillue aka Adam Schiff. So, get the tickets, ggutfeld.com. Now let's do this. Greg Fox News. All right.

Last night on the masked singer, Triumph the Insult Comic Dog HOSTed and made this guess about the Fox.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The possibility that it could be a Fox personality. Nobody's mentioned Lou Dobbs, Fox Business Network Anchorman.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUTFELD: You know what, Lou Dobbs is too important to do that show.

PERINO: He's busy.

GUTFELD: He's busy. I think the masked singer is inside a Lou Dobbs costume every night. There you go.

WILLIAMS: I thought he was too busy pumping your gas.

GUTFELD: That's true. Lamborghini.

WATTERS: Dana.

PERINO: All right, so one bride used her wedding day to encourage pet adoption in a very creative way. Check this out instead of having her bridesmaid carry flowers down the aisle. Andy Ondina (ph) ditched the traditional bouquets and had them hold puppies instead. They were pup K's like puppy K's. Get it, and each puppy was adoptable. The manager of a pet resort in Florida, she said she wanted to make sure we brought some awareness to shelter animals. We're so passionate about adopting versus shopping. The puppies at the wedding will spend a few more weeks with their mother. But guess we're welcome to fill out paperwork to adopt the pups when they are ready. That's cute.

GUTFELD: Bunch of dogs.

WATTERS: All right. Also, some wedding news. Congratulations. Fox News's very own. Rick Leventhal is engaged to a Real Housewives of Orange County star Kelly Dodd. They got engaged last night. Look at that ring. Very good, Rick. Well done.

Also. Katie and I face off.

GUTFELD: Not again.

WATTERS: Face off tonight at 8 o'clock in the News Quiz. Very funny.

PAVLICH: We both won like nine times, right.

WATTERS: Juan. Yes.

PAVLICH: We've got to figure it out here. Cheer for me.

WILLIAMS: Wait, who won last time?

PAVLICH: We've never gone against each other, but we both won nine in a row.

WILLIAMS: I'm going to have to watch. All right. Everybody my age knows Mr. Rogers. And now there is a new movie about the iconic child show host. It's coming out next week, it's called A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood.

Well, yesterday, it was World Kindness Day. And to celebrate Pittsburgh West Penn Hospital dressed up its infants in red cardigans to look like Mr. Rogers. TV station WQED in Pittsburgh has created a holiday cardigan day as a tribute to Mr. Rogers. The TV show, Mr. Rogers Neighborhood started on WQED in 1968, ran for 33 years. It still holds the record, the longest running entertainment show in history.

By the way, the hospital is letting the newborns keep their cardigans, so they can enter the world with a little kindness.

PAVLICH: That's really cute.

WATTERS: Katie.

PAVLICH: All right. Back to marriage proposal. A Hawaiian man was surfing with his girlfriend and instead of catching the next wave, he got down on one knee on his surfboard and proposed. You've got to be in really good shape to do that. So, while his now fianc, say yes, before Chris Garth dropped the ring in the ocean. Which wow, he dropped it.

(CROSSTALK)

PAVLICH: But it wasn't the real one, but he had an extra back at home because he knew this might happen. But Garth said he knew that it could go wrong. He is a dummy ring while they are out on the water. And the real bling-bling--

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: I should make an announcement now, Juan.

WATTERS: Speaking of weddings.

GUTFELD: Speaking of weddings, you want to do this now?

WILLIAMS: Go right ahead, man. This will shock America. I was shocked earlier. Katie.

WATTERS: All right.

PERINO: You've got to hang by yourself for 20 more second.

WATTERS: W ring.

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: If you are a good enough surfer, you don't need a dummy. That guy obviously not very good.

WILLIAMS: But how did Rick afford that ring.

WATTERS: Maybe it's a dummy ring. Set your DVRs. Never miss an episode of “The Five.” “Special Report” is up next with Bret.

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