Drunken NBA fan caused injuries to 12-year-old girl, mother claims in $453G lawsuit

A “visibly intoxicated” fan should have been ejected from an NBA game before falling into a 12-year-old girl and causing multiple injuries to the child, the girl’s mother claims in a $453,000 lawsuit.

The alleged collision happened in the closing minutes of a Nov. 30, 2018, game in Portland, Ore., between the Portland Trail Blazers and Denver Nuggets, the lawsuit says, according to OregonLive.com.

The unnamed girl suffered injuries to her head, collarbone, shoulder, chest, writ and legs, with medical bills totaling more than $3,500, according to the report.

JASON KIDD GETS RIPPED ON SOCIAL MEDIA FOR LEAVING OUT LAKERS COACH IN TWEET TO TEAM

The Portland Trail Blazers, in red uniforms, play an NBA preseason game against the Denver Nuggets at Memorial Coliseum in Portland, Ore., Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019. (Associated Press)

The Portland Trail Blazers, in red uniforms, play an NBA preseason game against the Denver Nuggets at Memorial Coliseum in Portland, Ore., Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019. (Associated Press)

In addition, the girl’s ability to compete in gymnastics has been affected, the mother claims in her request for $450,000 compensation for pain and suffering.

The allegedly drunken fan, who was also unnamed, tumbled down two rows of seats before striking the child, the suit says.

The lawsuit names the fan and the Blazers’ owners, Rip City Management, as defendants. The team declined to comment on the pending litigation, OregonLive.com reported.

The Trail Blazers were previously a center of controversy earlier this month, when its partnership with a supplier to the U.S. military ended a collaboration on a “Hometown Hero” program to honor local military veterans.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The Trail Blazers denied that the partnership ended because of pressure from a local group of Democratic Socialists, who opposed the team’s relationship with Leupold & Stevens over the company’s deal supplying rifle scopes to Israel, which the group described as a “brutal occupying force.”

The team said the company decided unilaterally to end its participation in the “Hero” program.