Huge venomous snake 'hiding' near playground captured after brief struggle, video shows

A large venomous snake was caught within about 16 feet of a children’s playground in Australia, a video has shown.

Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers posted a video on Facebook Saturday showing one of their wranglers catching a large eastern brown snake in a dry creek bed near a children’s playground in Beerwah, Queensland.

8-FOOT ALLIGATOR VISITS FLORIDA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL JUST BEFORE SUMMER BREAK

“We received a call this morning from a concerned resident who lived near this park in Beerwah,” the snake catchers explained in a Facebook post, which included a 3-minute video clip.

The video showed where the snake was found in the creek bed and its proximity to the playground.

“There is a decent-sized Eastern brown snake,” a wrangler can be heard saying as the video zooms in on the snake.

The snake catcher appears to set the camera down and can be seen walking into the frame with a bag and a pole, which he uses to try to lift the snake off the ground.

The snake appears to slither away into the wall of the creek bed, but the wrangler can be seen grabbing the snake’s tail before it got away.

Using the pole, the wrangler can be seen prying the snake out of the wall and — for several seconds — the snake jumps and appears to struggle against its captor, before the man picks up a bag and drops the snake inside it. The snake catcher then can be seen carefully tying the bag closed.

RARE VENOMOUS SNAKE RIDES ON MICHIGAN COUPLE’S KAYAK PADDLE, PICTURES SHOW: ‘HE WAS JUST TOTALLY CHILL’

“He had a bit on,” the wrangler can be heard saying after he picked up the camera.

“I think he got himself a little hiding spot. I saw him go straight in, straight in there,” he added, pointing the camera to a gap between two rock in the creek bed. “Cheeky little bugger ... He does not belong here … right next to a kids’ playground.”

Eastern brown snakes are the second most toxic snakes in the world, Live Science reported, citing Australia's Billabong Sanctuary. (iStock)

Eastern brown snakes are the second most toxic snakes in the world, Live Science reported, citing Australia's Billabong Sanctuary. (iStock)

In the caption of the video, the wrangler said he talked to residents in the area and “found out that this particular snake had been hanging around there for a while.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

He encouraged people to notify snake handlers if they see a snake in or nearby local parks.

“Majority of the time the snakes can be left alone and they will move on but this large eastern brown was hiding amongst the rocks so he needed to be relocated,” the man concluded.

Australian brown snakes are highly venomous, according to Live Science. Eastern brown snakes, in particular, are the second most toxic snakes in the world, the outlet reported, citing Australia’s Billabong Sanctuary.