Coordinated strategy to accelerate COVID-19 vaccine is needed, top researchers say

Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox. Sign up here.

A harmonized and collaborative approach to the clinical testing, scale-up and distribution of candidate vaccines to prevent COVID-19 is essential, top scientific leaders write in a perspective published today in Science.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, government, industry and academia have introduced a variety of vaccine candidates.

The authors note in their piece that more than one effective vaccine approach likely will be required to successfully protect the global community from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. They advocate for a strategic approach to research and development that would generate crucial data for multiple vaccine candidates simultaneously.

TOP SCIENTIST WHO BATTLED COVID-19 SAYS 'WE WILL NEVER ... LIVE NORMALLY' WITHOUT A VACCINE

The scientists -- who include NIH Director Francis Collins and NIAID Director Anthony Fauci -- also say that no single vaccine or vaccine platform is likely to meet the worldwide need, emphasizing the need for a coordinated and strategic approach to vaccine development.

Developing COVID-19 vaccines will require unprecedented cooperation from governments, academic institutions, industry, and global philanthropic partners, they write.

Researchers need to learn more about what constitutes a durable protective immune response against COVID-19, scientists write. They also explain that trials for several candidate vaccines could be conducted in parallel to generate essential safety and efficacy data and accelerate the timeline of COVID-19 vaccines.

MEN HAVE HIGH LEVELS OF ENZYME KEY TO COVID-19 INFECTION, STUDY SAYS

The authors propose specific approaches to harmonizing the clinical testing of multiple vaccine products, including using common clinical trials designs, clinical endpoints, standardized immune assays and a common Data Safety and Monitoring Board.

As of Monday evening, there were at least 1,344,512 infected and 80,087 deaths from COVID-19 in the United States.