Amazing stone age ax discovered

A student taking part in his first ever archaeological dig has discovered an incredible ax dating back to the 'New Stone Age.'

Joe Neal, a second-year archaeology student at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, found the amazing Neolithic artifact during a dig at Talsarn in Wales.  Neal was taking part in undergraduate fieldwork when he made the remarkable find.

“It’s a great find for us, I couldn’t have hoped to find anything better,” he said, in a statement. This is my first dig and the first time I have found anything, so this is great.”

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Experts were surprised to find the ax head at the site, which dates back to between 4,000 and 6,000 years ago.  “This artefact would have taken a considerable time to make and it is perhaps surprising that it was abandoned in this landscape,” explained the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, in the statement.

The ax was discovered in by Joe Neal, a second-year archaeology student at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David.

The ax was discovered in by Joe Neal, a second-year archaeology student at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David. (University of Wales Trinity Saint David)

“When we began our excavations we did not anticipate finding Neolithic artefacts so this is a bonus for the team,” added Dr. Martin Bates, a geoarchaeologist at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, who led the excavation.

Other ancient sites in Wales have been revealing their secrets. Experts, for example, have been unlocking new details of a Roman villa at Abermagwr in west Wales.

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The ax head was discovered at Talsarn in Wales.

The ax head was discovered at Talsarn in Wales. (University of Wales Trinity Saint David)

In 2017 archaeologists discovered a Bronze Age cemetery at a ritual site on the Welsh island of Anglesey.

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A strange prehistoric forest was recently revealed on a Welsh beach in the aftermath of Storm Hannah.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers