Ginsburg cheers on #MeToo movement in advance of Kavanaugh-Ford hearing

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg celebrated the #MeToo movement on Wednesday, just a day before a highly-anticipated U.S. Senate panel hearing into sexual misconduct accusations against high court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

“Every woman of my vintage has not just one story but many stories, but we thought there was nothing you could do about it – boys will be boys – so just find a way to get out of it,” Ginsburg said during an event with first-year law students at Georgetown University in Washington, Reuters reported.

"Every woman of my vintage has not just one story but many stories, but we thought there was nothing you could do about it – boys will be boys – so just find a way to get out of it."

— U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

When asked about her views on the current women’s movement, Ginsburg replied by saying she was “cheered on” by the #MeToo movement that has led to the downfall of multiple rich and powerful men over sexual misconduct.

Ginsburg said the movement shows that women are united. “So it was one complaint and then one after another the complaints mounted. So women nowadays are not silent about bad behavior,” she said.

"So it was one complaint and then one after another the complaints mounted. So women nowadays are not silent about bad behavior."

— U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ginsburg didn’t name Kavanaugh during the event, but her comments come just a day before Kavanaugh was set to face the Senate Judiciary Committee’s grilling over multiple sexual misconduct allegations.

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Christine Blasey Ford, the first person who accused Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her in 1982, will also testify before the committee.

In recent days, two other women have come forward with allegations, with Julie Swetnick being the latest accuser. She claims Kavanaugh was participating in “gang rapes” and rape “trains” in the 1980s.

Ginsburg, 85, has served on the nation's highest court since 1993, when she was nominated by former President Bill Clinton. She became the second female justice in the court's history, behind Sandra Day O'Connor, the now-retired justice who was appointed by former President Ronald Reagan in 1981.