Jay Sekulow:  The questions Robert Mueller must be asked on July 17

Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller has agreed to openly testify before Congress on July 17. He’ll appear before two Democratically-controlled House committees after being subpoenaed by them.

The Democrats chose to subpoena Mueller; but their partisan move will backfire on them -- significantly.

The hearing -- set up by the angry Democrats -- will provide a forum where the rest of the story about the Russia investigation must be told. But the problem for Democrats is that Mueller will not provide any new information.

MUELLER SUBPOENA COULD BACKFIRE ON DEMOCRATS, SAY POLITICAL, LEGAL EXPERTS

How do I know this? Because Mueller’s report will be his testimony and his testimony will be his report.

Mueller has made it clear he will not testify about any further details that were not already included in his public report. His conclusion: there was no collusion. While Mueller elected not to reach a conclusion on obstruction, the Justice Department did – there was none.

The upcoming Congressional hearings in July are pure political theatre. There is nothing new to learn. This is just an effort by Democrats to keep the anti-Trump narrative alive as long as they can.

But Mueller’s appearance before Congress is certain to create problems for Democrats.

The upcoming Congressional hearings in July are pure political theatre. There is nothing new to learn. This is just an effort by Democrats to keep the anti-Trump narrative alive as long as they can.    

Why? Because Mueller will face questions from Republicans, too. Discerning questions. Fact-finding questions. Questions Americans have wanted to be answered for a long time. Questions that will get to what really went on.

There are many difficult questions that Mueller will face. Here’s just a few:

  • When did you know that there was, in fact, no collusion or conspiracy by the Trump campaign with Russia?
  • What did you do with evidence gathered by former FBI agent Peter Strzok?
  • Why did you not take an inventory of the contents of Strzok’s phone when he was terminated?
  • Why did you allow the phone to be wiped clean and be reissued?
  • Do you really believe it is the job of a prosecutor to exonerate a person after an investigation? Did you not conflate the prosecution’s burden of proof?

These questions are just the beginning. There will be more questions. Questions about conflicts of interest. Questions about evidence of political bias. Questions about irregularities. There will be more questions. And Mueller will not be able to avoid.

Mueller will have a lot to explain.

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The fact is that Mueller’s report really was an exoneration of President Trump. There was no collusion. No obstruction.

The investigation is over. We won.

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