Ibuprofen being studied in coronavirus treatment

A trial in the U.K. will assess whether a modified form of anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen can help alleviate breathing issues from coronavirus.

The team from London’s Guy’s and St Thomas’ hospital and Kings College will study whether three doses of lipid ibuprofen in coronavirus patients could lessen the severity and progression of lung injury.

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If successful, outcomes could include shorter hospital stays and fewer patients in need of ventilators.

The UK researchers will determine whether the modified ibuprofen could lessen lung injury due to coronavirus. (iStock)

The UK researchers will determine whether the modified ibuprofen could lessen lung injury due to coronavirus. (iStock)

The trial, called Liberate, is recruiting patients and estimates a total of 230 participants, male or female, who are at least 18 years old, according to a database of worldwide clinical studies. The estimated completion date for the study is late May 2021.

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The use of ibuprofen in treating coronavirus invoked controversy earlier in the pandemic, after French officials warned the drug could actually worsen the effects of the virus. The World Health Organization soon followed suit in this opinion, though it has since retracted its warning against ibuprofen in the treatment of coronavirus.

There is insufficient evidence to conclude ibuprofen can worsen COVID-19 symptoms, according to the Commission on Human Medicines.

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Patients who have been prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), like ibuprofen, for long-term conditions like arthritis should continue taking the medicines as normal, the U.K. legislative committee advised.

Fox News’ Morgan Phillips contributed to this report.