Coronavirus outbreak: How to maintain healthy snacking habits while working from home

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Working from home can have added temptations – yes, we’re looking at you, candy drawer. And also you, pantry, with three different types of potato chips.

So how can you stay productive, and not spend the entire day snacking? Or furthermore – how can you stay productive, and not gain weight during WFH? In an interview with Fox News, Jaclyn London, RD, head of Nutrition and Wellness for WW, gave her top tips and tricks to avoid packing on the pounds while being stuck inside.

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Stick to a regular eating schedule

Though the current climate is a bit hectic, London recommends sticking to your normal schedule as best as you can. That means, whatever times during the day you would usually eat if you were in the office, eat during those same times at home.

“Try to make your snacks unique, for example fruit on skewers – like cubes of pineapple and clementine slices; bananas with halved strawberries or mango with blueberries,” Dr. London said.

“Try to make your snacks unique, for example fruit on skewers – like cubes of pineapple and clementine slices; bananas with halved strawberries or mango with blueberries,” Dr. London said. (iStock)

Make snacks ahead of time

Try to mitigate the mindless snacking by planning ahead. London says to put some healthy snack options in clear containers, on eye-level shelves in your fridge and pantry.

“Try to make your snacks unique, for example, fruit on skewers – like cubes of pineapple and clementine slices; bananas with halved strawberries or mango with blueberries,” she said.

“Also consider low-fat, plain Greek yogurt, or cottage cheese for dips or as a part of breakfast,” she added, to keep you fuller for longer.

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Change up your environment

If you notice you are prone to stress eating, change locations. Moving your workstation can help you better manage the urge to eat. Or just taking a 15-minute break from work and whatever is making you feel overwhelmed. If possible, go outside for some fresh air. Or text a friend or distract yourself with a quick game app on your phone, London suggests.

“A brief distraction can puncture the stress bubble and intercept an unwanted snack attack," she added.

Listen to your body

Is your urge to eat from hunger? Or just boredom? London says to first identify the craving and then sate it.

“Do a quick rundown of possible reasons for those cravings,” she said. “This will help empower you to brainstorm workable solutions.

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For example, she says, if you notice having a poor sleep cycle has increased your snacking, then “avoiding stressful news programs before bed, or setting an alert on your phone to break for a proper lunch every day” can help.

Be kind to yourself

“Know that stress-eating isn’t a sign of failure,” London said. “A health-promoting pattern of eating is one that supports your well-being physically and mentally.”

“No single meal or snack can make or break your journey,” she added.

As best as you can, stick to a healthy eating schedule and try to set alarms to go for walks or breathe deeply to reduce stress. But, “if you’re having a hard day and just want to enjoy some gummy worms, darn it, don’t beat yourself up for being ‘powerless,’” she said.

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