Filtered coffee is more heart healthy than other brewing methods, study claims

Say what you will, coffee purists, but the best way to brew is by the humble drip method, cardiologists claim.

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Between 2018 and 2019, the world’s coffee growers produced nearly 1.357 trillion pounds of coffee, and the unfathomable number of cups that makes means the plant-derived stimulant has far-reaching health effects.

A Swedish university study that aimed to analyze the risks associated with different brewing methods has revealed that drinking filtered coffee is more heart-healthy than not.

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Filtered coffee, as with drip or pour-over, provided a 15 percent cut in risk of death from any cause. In terms of cardiovascular-disease risk, filtered coffee was linked to a 12 percent decreased risk of death in men, and a 20 percent discount for women.

Published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, the findings -- which include that drinking filtered coffee may actually extend your life compared to drinking no coffee at all -- are a boon to coffee snobs everywhere.

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French press is not as heart-healthy as filtered coffee.

French press is not as heart-healthy as filtered coffee. (iStock)

“Our study provides strong and convincing evidence of a link between coffee brewing methods, heart attacks and longevity,” said University of Gothenburg professor Dag S. Thelle. “Unfiltered coffee contains substances which increase blood cholesterol. Using a filter removes these and makes heart attacks and premature death less likely.”

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Thelle has been studying coffee for a long time. In the early '90s, he discovered that coffee-drinking was linked to higher rates of cholesterol, particularly “bad” LDL cholesterol. Further experimentation uncovered the lipid-raising compounds in coffee and showed that unfiltered coffee contained 30 times the concentration of those substances compared to filtered.

Read the complete article here on the New York Post.

This article originally appeared on the New York Post.