Honolulu and Oahu

Why Trump supporters' #BoycottHawaii movement is backfiring

Hawaii's state Attorney General blasts the president's order

 

After a federal court in Hawaii ruled Wednesday to place a hold on President Trump’s revised travel ban, supporters of the president (and his immigration policies) began pushing for a boycott against the Aloha State using the hashtag #BoycottHawaii.

 

Outraged advocates for the ban say they're now planning to stop buying products from the state, and some have claimed they've even cancelled already booked vacations.

But the proposed boycott has already had one major unintended consequence.  

It turns out, many Hawaiian residents—some of whom have a love/hate relationship with tourists from the mainland—don’t seem too upset about the idea of less crowded beaches and non-natives no longer ‘desecrating’ their sacred lands. 

Although the so-called deplorables are trying to punish Hawaii and its residents by hurting its tourism industry, the state's residents appear to be looking forward to empty beaches and less traffic.

With no Trump supporters around, anti-Trumpers seem to be finding the idea of an island devoid of presidential devotees all the more appealing.

Boycotts (and "buy-cotts") have played a major role pitting Trump supporters against those who disagree with his policies. Recently, supports of the president, and the first family, launched a similar boycott against Nordstrom after the department store decided to drop Ivanka Trump’s clothing line. In January, when Starbucks announced it would hire 10,000 refugees, many Trump supporters pledged to stop buying the chain's coffee.